Error Proof Stamping Applications with Pressure Sensors

When improving product quality or production efficiency, manufacturing engineers typically turn to automation solutions to error proof and improve their application. In stamping applications, that often leads to adding sensors to help detect the presence of a material or a feature in a part being formed, for example, a hole in a part. In the stamping world, this can be referred to as “In-Die Sensing” or “Die Protection.” The term “Die Protection” is used because if the sensors do not see the material in the correct location when forming, then it could cause a die crash. The cost of a die crash can add up quickly. Not only is there lost production time, but also damage to the die that can be extremely costly to repair. Typically, several sensors are used throughout the die to look for material or features in the material at different locations, to make sure the material is present to protect the die. Manufacturing engineers tend to use photoelectric and/or inductive proximity sensors in these applications; however, pressure sensors are a cost-effective and straightforward alternative.

In today’s stamping applications, manufacturing engineers want to stamp parts faster while reducing downtime and scrap. One growing trend in press shops is the addition of nitrogen on the dies. By adding nitrogen-filled gas springs and/or nitrogen gas-filled lifters, the press can run faster and cycle parts through quicker.

Typically, the die is charged with nitrogen before the press starts running parts. Today, many stamping plants rely on an analog dial gauge (image 1) to determine if there is sufficient nitrogen pressure to operate safely. When a new die is set in the press, someone must look at the gauge and make sure it is correct before running the press. There is no type of signal or feedback from this gauge to the PLC or the press; therefore, no real error proofing method is in place to notify the operator if the pressure rating is correct or even present before starting the press. If the operator starts running the press without any nitrogen for the springs, then it will not cycle the material and can cause a crash.

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Another, likely more significant problem engineers face is a hole forming in one of the hoses while they are running. A very small hole in a hose may not be noticeable to the operator and may not even show up on the analog dial gauge. Without this feedback from the gauge, the press will continue to run and increase the likelihood that the parts will be stamped and be out of specification, causing unnecessary scrap. Scrap costs can be quite large and grow larger until the leak is discovered. Additionally, if the material cannot move through the press properly because of a lack of nitrogen pressure to the springs or lifters, it could cause material to back up and cause a crash.

By using a pressure sensor, you can set high and low pressure settings that will give an output when either of those is reached. The outputs can be discrete, analog, or IO-Link, and they can be tied to your PLC to trigger an alarm for the operator, send an alert to the HMI, or even stop the press. You can also have the PLC make sure pressure is present before starting the press to verify it was adequately charged with nitrogen during set up.

Adding an electronic pressure sensor to monitor the nitrogen pressure is a simple and cost-effective way to error proof this application and avoid costly problems.

Temperature sensing of process media — a hot topic in today’s manufacturing

Continuous control of process media significantly contributes to the reliability of industrial production. More and more process technology is involved in industrial manufacturing.  Besides pressure and level sensors, temperature sensors are also needed to monitor and control these media. Although new machine designs are often optimized in terms of energy efficiency, heat is added to the production equipment.

Thermal reading of media by temperature sensors

Process stability

To achieve a defined and stable temperature level (in many cases only slightly above the environmental temperature) the added heat dissipation of the production process constantly must be managed. Typically a coolant liquid or hydraulic fluid is cycling through the areas of the production equipment, which tend to heat up. It then runs to a heat exchanger system which cools down the liquid to a defined value. Some applications even require a defined viscosity of the liquids in use. Often the media viscosity depends on its temperature. Historically classic cylindrical housing temperature probes have been applied for temperature measurement. The values are transferred by cables to a PLC. For factory automation applications, housings with integrated display and an adjustable switching point (via pushbutton parametrization) have become more and more popular.

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Many housing styles now also include a digital display so in addition to the sensor transmitting temperature values via cable to the control system, they provide a visual monitoring functionality for the machine/plant operator.

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Hydraulic power pack

Monitoring of industrial processes

Monitoring of industrial processes has become more and more relevant. With increasing digitalization in manufacturing, the demand of transparent visualization of the production constantly grows.

 

Clamp Control of Tools and Workpieces

In Metalworking, the clamping status of tools and workpieces are monitored in many Image1applications. Typically, inductive sensors are used to control this.

Three positions are usually detected: Unclamped, clamped with object, and clamped without object. The sensor position is mechanically adjusted to the application so the correct clamping process and clamping status is detected with a proper switch point. Additionally, with the usage of several sensors in many cases the diagnostic coverage is increased.

For approximately 15 years, inductive distance sensors with analog output signals have been utilized in these applications with the advantage of providing more flexibility.

 Image2By using a tapered (conical) shape, an axial movement of the clamping rod can be sensed (as a change of distance to the inductive sensor with analog output). Several sensors with binary (switching) output can be replaced with a sensor using such a continuous output signal (0..10V, 4-20 mA or e.g. IO-Link). Let’s figure a tool in a spindle is replaced by another tool with a different defined clamping position. Now, rather than mechanically changing the mechanical position of the inductive sensor with binary output, the parameter values for the correct analog signal window are adjusted in the control system. This allows easy parameter setting to the application, relevant if the dimensions of the clamped object may vary with different production lots.

The latest state-of-the-art sensor solution is the concept of a compact linear position system which is built of several inductive sensor elements mounted in one single housing. Image3

Instead of a tapered (conical) shape, a disk shaped target moves lateral to the sensor. From small strokes (e.g. 14 mm) up to more than 100 mm, different product variants offer the best combination of compact design and needed lateral movement. Having data about the clamping force (e.g. by using pressure sensors to monitor the hydraulic pressure) will lead to additional information about the clamping status.

For more information on linear position sensors visit www.balluff.com.

For more information on pressure sensors, visit www.balluff.com.

 

Acids Can Put Your Sensors in a Pickle

In many types of metals production, pickling is a process that is essential to removing impurities and contaminants from the surface of the material prior to further processing, such as the application of anti-corrosion coatings.

In steel production, two common pickling solutions or pickle liquors are hydrochloric acid (HCl) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Both of these acids are very effective at removing rust and iron oxide scale from the steel prior to additional processing, for example galvanizing or rolling. The choice of acid depends on the processing temperature, the type of steel being processed, and environmental containment and recovery considerations. Hydrochloric acid creates corrosive fumes when heated, so it typically must be used at lower temperatures where processing times are longer. It is also more expensive to recover when spent. Sulfuric acid can be used at higher temperatures for faster processing, but it can attack the base metal more aggressively and create embrittlement due to hydrogen diffusion into the metal.

Acids can be just as tough on all of the equipment involved in the pickling lines, including sensors. When selecting sensors for use in areas involving liquid acid solutions and gaseous fumes and vapors, care must be given to the types of acids involved and to the materials used in the construction of the sensor, particularly the materials that may be in direct contact with the media.

PressureSensor
A pressure sensor specifically designed for use with acidic media, at temperatures up to 125° C.

A manufacturer of silicon steel was having issues with frequent failure of mechanical pressure sensors on the pickling line, due to the effects of severe corrosion from hydrochloric acid at 25% concentration. After determination of the root cause of these failures and evaluation of alternatives, the maintenance team selected an electronic pressure sensor with a process connection custom-made from PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride), a VitonTM O-ring, and a ceramic (rather than standard stainless steel) pressure diaphragm. This changeover eliminated the corroded mechanical pressure sensors as an ongoing maintenance problem, increasing equipment availability and freeing up maintenance personnel to address other issues on the line.