Let’s Get Small: The Drive Toward Miniaturization

minisensorGoing about our hectic daily lives, we tend to just take the modern cycle of innovation for granted. But when we stop to think about it, the changes we have seen in the products we buy are astonishing. This is especially true with regard to electronics. Not only are today’s products more feature-laden, more reliable, and more functional…they are also unbelievably small.

I remember our family’s first “cell phone” back in the ’90s. It was bolted to the floor of the car, required a rooftop antenna, and was connected to the car’s electrical system for power. All it did was place and receive phone calls. Today we are all carrying around miniature pocket computers we call “smartphones,” where the telephone functionality is – in reality – just another “app”.

Again going back two decades, we had a 32″ CRT analog television that displayed standard definition and weighed over 200 pounds; it took two strong people to move it around the house. Today it’s common to find 55″ LCD high-definition digital televisions that weigh only 50 pounds and can be moved around by one person with relative ease.

LabPhotoThese are just a couple of examples from the consumer world. Similar changes are taking place in the industrial and commercial world. Motors, controllers, actuators, and drives are shrinking. Today’s industrial actuators and motion systems offer either the same speed and power with less size and weight, or are simply more compact and efficient than ever before possible.

The advent of all this product miniaturization is driving a need for equally miniaturized manufacturing and assembly processes. And that means rising demand for miniaturized industrial sensors such as inductive proximity sensors, photoelectric presence sensors, and capacitive proximity sensors.

Another thing about assembling small things: the manufacturing tolerances also get small. The demand for sensor precision increases in direct proportion to manufacturing size reduction. Fortunately, miniature sensors are also inherently precision sensors. As sensors shrink in size, their sensing behavior typically becomes more precise. In absolute terms, things like repeatability, temperature drift, and hysteresis all improve markedly as sensor size diminishes. Miniature sensors can deliver the precise, repeatable, and consistent sensing performance demanded by the field of micro-manufacturing.

For your next compact assembly project, be sure to think about the challenges of your precision sensing applications, and how you plan to deploy miniature sensors to achieve consistent and reliable operation from your process.

For more information on precision sensing visit balluff.us/minis.

There’s more than just one miniature sensor technology

As I discussed in my last blog post, there is a need for miniature, precision sensors. However, finding the right solution for a particular application can be a difficult process. Since every sensor technology has its own strengths and weaknesses, it is vital to have a variety of different sensor options to choose from.

The good news is that there are several different technologies to consider in the miniature, precision sensor world. Here we will briefly look at three technologies: photoelectric, capacitive, and inductive. Together these three technologies have the ability to cover a wide range of applications.

Photoelectric Sensors

MiniPhotoelectricPhotoelectric sensors use a light emitter and receiver to detect the presence or absence of an object. This type of sensor comes in different styles for flexibility in sensing. A through-beam photoelectric is ideal for long range detection and small part detection. Whereas a diffuse photoelectric is ideal for applications where space is limited or in applications where sensing is only possible from one side.

Miniature photoelectric sensors come with either the electronics fully integrated into the sensor or as a sensor with separate electronics in a remote amplifier.

Capacitive Sensors

MiniCapacitiveCapacitive sensors use the electrical property of capacitance and work by measuring changes in this electrical property as an object enters its sensing field. Capacitive sensors detect the presence or absence of virtually any object with any material, from metals to powders to liquids. It also has the ability to sense through a plastic or glass container wall to detect proper fill level of the material inside the container.

Miniature capacitive sensors come with either the electronics fully integrated into the sensor or as a sensor with separate electronics in a remote amplifier.

Inductive Sensors

MiniInductiveInductive sensors use a coil and oscillator to create a magnetic field to detect the presence or absence of any metal object. The presence of a metal object in the sensing field dampens the oscillation amplitude. This type of sensor is, of course, ideal for detecting metal objects.

Miniature inductive sensors come with the electronics fully integrated into the sensor.

One sensor technology isn’t enough since there isn’t a single technology that will work across all applications. It’s good to have options when looking for an application solution.

To learn more about these technologies, visit www.balluff.us

Trending Now: Miniature Sensors

Celebrating the Holiday season is one of my favorite times of the year. Some of the common activities I enjoy include spending time with family and friends, eating a tremendous amount of food (and wondering afterward why I do this to myself year after year), and giving and receiving a few presents. Let’s focus on the presents aspect for a second. The bigger the present the better, right? Well, we know that’s not always the case. That smaller present could very well be the perfect gift.

minifamilyNow let’s shift gears and look at manufacturing. There is a trend in manufacturing, in general, toward miniaturization. Earlier this year I was shown a website, MICRO Manufacturing, that looks across different industries to see how the miniaturization trend is being engaged. One of the more obvious cases is in consumer electronics. It all started taking off with the desktop computer. Following the desktop computer was the laptop. And in the past few years we’ve seen the rise of smartphones and tablets. Now we’re beginning to see smart wearable devices (watches, fitness trackers, glasses, etc.). Who knows what will happen next? I bet we could take a good guess: it’ll be something even smaller.

As manufacturing continues in this direction, the demand for miniature sensors grows. However, miniature sensors aren’t just defined by their small form factor, but also by their precision. Miniature sensors are developed with a clear purpose to meet these manufacturing requirements. For more information, please click here.

And, just like that small present during the Holidays, a miniature, precision sensor could be the perfect solution.