Food for Thought: Should a Fork Sensor be Your First Choice?

When it comes to reliability and accuracy, there is no optical sensing mode better than the through-beam photoelectric sensor. Its reliability is a result of the extraordinary levels of excess gain – the measurement of light energy above the level required for normal sensing. The more excess gain, the more tolerant of dirt, moisture and debris accumulating on the sensor.

Excess gain comparison

The accuracy of through-beams results from a tight, well-defined sensing area. This chart shows a comparison between the popular sensing modes.

When it comes to reliability and accuracy, there is no optical sensing mode better than the through-beam photoelectric sensor. Its reliability is a result of the extraordinary levels of excess gain – the measurement of light energy above the level required for normal sensing. The more excess gain, the more tolerant of dirt, moisture and debris accumulating on the sensor. The accuracy of through-beams results from a tight, well-defined sensing area. This chart shows a comparison between the popular sensing modes.

The sensing area starts with an emitted beam projected onto the receiver. The wider the emitted beam, the easier to align. Once aligned, you now have the effective beam which is basically the size of the emitter and receiver lens. The smaller the lens, the smaller the effective beam. Apertures can also be used to narrow down the effective beam.

Simple detection

A target is detected when it breaks the effective beam. The simple detection principle means these sensors can detect anything, regardless of color, texture, or reflectivity. They are generally used in applications that require a sensing range of 2mm to 100m! The simplicity of their operation and wide range make them a go-to detection solution across industries.

Fork sensor, effective beam_emitted beamTraditional through-beam sensors consist of two separate pieces which must be separately mounted and wired, and perfectly aligned to work. This can be inconvenient and time consuming. But for those applications that can use an opening from 5mm to 220mm, self-contained through-beam sensors, also called fork sensors, provide the usefulness of traditional through-beams without the trouble of alignment. With the emitter and receiver in one housing, they are automatically aligned and require only half the wiring effort.

Light types

Available in four different light types – red light, pinpoint red light, infrared and laser – they can detect even difficult and tiny parts. Red light and pinpoint red light are used for most applications, while laser light is used for small part detection, as small as 0.08 mm. Infrared improves detection efforts in dirty environments.

Through-beam sensors are a go-to solution for photoelectric applications, but with tough housings, various lighting options, and the ease of installation and alignment, fork sensors should be first on your list of photoelectric sensors to consider.

Getting Retroreflective with Photoelectric Sensors

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retroreflectivesensorsThe most popular photoelectric sensor used is the retro-reflective or reflex mode sensor. One of the advantages of the retroreflective style photoelectric sensors is the light emitter, or light source, and the receiver are in the same enclosure, thus you only have a single device to mount and wire making installation easier and faster. The output of the sensor changes state when the object blocks the light beam between the sensor and the reflector.

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