IO-Link Event Data: How Sensors Tell You How They’re Doing

I have been working with IO-Link for more than 10 years, so I’ve heard lots of questions about how it works. One line of questions I hear from customers is about the operating condition of sensors. “I wish I knew when the IO-Link device loses output power,” or, “I wish my IO-Link photoelectric sensor would let me know when the lens is dirty.” The good news is that it does give you this information by sending Event Data. That’s a type of data that is usually not a focus of users, although it is available in JSON format from the REST API.

There are three types of IO-Link data:

      • Process Data – updated cyclically, it’s important to users because it contains the data for use in the running application, like I/O change of states or measurement values like temperature and position, etc.
      • Parameter Data – updated acyclically, it’s important to users because it’s the mechanism to read and write parameter values like setpoints, thresholds, and configuration settings to the sensor, and for reading non-time critical values like operating hours, etc.
      • Event Data – updated acyclically, it’s important to users because it provides immediate updates on device conditions.

Let’s dig deeper into Event Data. An Event is a status update from the IO-Link device when a condition is out of its normal range. The Event is labeled as a Warning or Error based on the severity of the condition change.

When an Event occurs on the IO-Link device, the device sets the Event Flag bit in the outgoing data packet to the IO-Link Master. The Master receives the Event Flag and then queries the IO-Link device for the Event information.

It is important to note that this is a one-time data message. The IO-Link device only sends the Event Flag at the moment the condition is out of range, and then again when the condition is back in range.

Event Data Types, Modes, and Codes

Event Data has three following three components:

      • Event Type – categorized in three ways
        • Notification – a simple event update; nothing is abnormal with the IO-Link device
        • Warning – a condition is out of range and risks damaging the IO-Link device
        • Error – a condition is out of range and is affecting the device negatively to the point that it may not function as expected
      • Event Mode – categorized in three ways
        • Event notice – usually associated with Event Type notifications, message will not be updated
        • Event appears – the condition is now out of range
        • Event disappears – the condition is now back in range
      • Event Code
        • A two-byte Hex code that represents the condition that is out of range

IO-Link condition monitoring sensor

To bring all these components together, let’s look at a photoelectric IO-Link sensor with internal condition monitoring functions and see what Events are available for it in this device manual screenshot. This device has Events for temperature (both warning and error), voltage, inclination (sensor angle is out of range), vibration, and signal quality (dirty lens).

By monitoring these events, you have a better feel for the conditions of your IO-Link device. Along with helping you identify immediate problems, this can help you in planning preventive and planned maintenance.

An IO-Link condition monitoring sensor uses Event Data similarly to report when conditions exceed the thresholds that you have set. For example, when the vibration level exceeds the threshold value, the IO-Link device sends the Warning event flag and the IO-Link Master queries for the event data. The event data consists of an Event Type, an Event Mode, and an Event Code that represents the specific alarm condition that is out of range. Remember this is a one-time action; the IO-Link sensor will not report this again until the value is in an acceptable range.

When the vibration level is back in range, the alarm condition is no longer present in the IO-Link device, the process repeats itself. In this case the Event Type and Event Code will be the same. The only change is that the Event Mode will report Event Disappears.

Within the IO-Link Specification there is a list of defined Event Codes that are common across all vendors. There is also a block of undefined Event Code values that allow vendors to create Event Codes that are unique to their specific device.

“I wish the IO-Link device would let me know….” In the end, the device might be telling you what you want to know, especially if the device has condition monitoring functions built into it. If you want to know more about condition monitoring in your IO-Link devices, check out the Event section in the vendor’s manuals so you can learn how to use this information.

Control Meets IIoT, Providing Insights into a New World

In manufacturing and automation control, the programmable logic controller (PLC) is an essential tool. And since the PLC is integrated into the machine already, it’s understandable that you might see the PLC as all that you need to do anything in automation on the manufacturing floor.

Condition monitoring in machine automation

For example, process or condition monitoring is emerging as an important automation feature that can help ensure that machines are running smoothly. This can be done by monitoring motor or mechanical vibration, temperature or pressure. You can also add functionality for a machine or line configuration or setup by adding sensors to verify fixture locations for machine configuration at changeovers.

One way to do this is to wire these sensors to the PLC and modify its code and use it as an all-in-one device. After all, it’s on the machine already. But there’s a definite downside to using a PLC this way. Its processing power is limited, and there are limits to the number of additional processes and functions it can run. Why risk possible complications that could impact the reliability of your control systems? There are alternatives.

External monitoring and support processes

Consider using more flexible platforms, such as an edge gateway, Linux, and IO-Link. These external sources open a whole new world of alternatives that provide better reliability and more options for today and the future. It also makes it easier to access and integrate condition monitoring and configuration data into enterprise IT/OT (information technology/operational technology) systems, which PLCs are not well suited to interface with, if they can be integrated at all.

Here are some practical examples of this type of augmented or add-on/retrofit functionality:

      • Motor or pump vibration condition monitoring
      • Support-process related pressure, vibration and temperature monitoring
      • Monitoring of product or process flow
      • Portable battery based/cloud condition monitoring
      • Mold and Die cloud-based cycle/usage monitoring
      • Product changeover, operator guidance system
      • Automatic inventory monitoring warehouse system

Using external systems for these additional functions means you can readily take advantage of the ever-widening availability of more powerful computing systems and the simple connectivity and networking of smart sensors and transducers. Augmenting and improving your control systems with external monitoring and support processes is one of the notable benefits of employing Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and Industry 4.0 tools.

The ease of with which you can integrate these systems into IT/OT systems, even including cloud-based access, can dramatically change what is now available for process information-gathering and monitoring and augment processes without touching or effecting the rudimentary control system of new or existing machines or lines. In many cases, external systems can even be added at lower price points than PLC modification, which means they can be more easily justified for their ROI and functionality.

IO-Link Benefits in Robotic Weld Cell Tooling

By Scott Barhorst

Working previously as a controls engineering manager in robotic welding, I have seen some consistent challenges when designing robotic weld cell systems.

For example, the pre-engineered-style welding cells I’ve worked with use many types of tooling. At the same time, space for tooling and cabling is limited, and so is the automation on board, with some using PLC function and others using a robot controller to process data.

One approach that worked well was to use IO-Link in the systems I designed. With its simple open fieldbus communication interface and digital transmission, it brought a number of benefits.

    1.  IO-Link’s digital signals aren’t affected by noise, so I could use smart sensors and connect them with unshielded 4-pin cables.
    2.  Expandability was easy, either from the Master block or by adding discrete I/O modules.
    3.  IO-Link can use the ID of the block to identify the fixture it is associated with to make sure the correct fixture is in the correct location.
    4.  Cabling is simplified with IO-Link, since the IO-Link Master can control both inputs, outputs, and control valve packs. That means that the only cables needed will be 24V power, Ethernet, weld ground (depending on the system), and air.
    5.  Fewer cables means less cost for cables and installation, cable management is improved, and there are fewer cables to run through a tailstock or turntable access hole.

One system I designed used 1 IO-Link Master block, 3 discrete I/O modules, and 1 SMC valve manifold controlled via IO-Link. This tooling had 16 clamps and 10 sensors, requiring 42 total inputs and control of 16 valves. The system worked very well with this setup!

An additional note: It’s good to think beyond the process at hand to how it might be used in the future. A system built on IO-Link is much more adaptable to different tooling when a change-over is needed. Click here to read more about how to use IO-Link in welding environments.

 

 

 

 

 

3 Easy Options to Get Started With IIoT in 2022

The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) may seem large, intimidating, and challenging to implement; however, new systems and solutions will eliminate the perceived barriers for entry. As we wrap up the year and make plans for 2022, now is a great time to resolve to modernize your facility.

Do you have a process, system or machine that has outlived its life expectancy for many years or even decades and isn’t up to current IIoT standards? Great news: you have several options for updating.

Traditional approach

The traditional approach allows you to use your current controller to output your information to your existing database. If you want to try IIoT on your current setup and your controller cannot be modified, a self-contained system will allow for ultimate flexibility. It will provide you with access to the data based off an extra layer of sensing with a focus on condition monitoring. This approach is the least expensive route, however, if database access is restricted the following options may be better choices.

Cloud-based current industry standard

A second option is to use a portable monitoring system that has a condition monitoring sensor. It is essentially five sensors in one package that can hook up to a system using the cellular network to report data to a secure cloud database. This approach is useful in remote locations or where local network access is limited. If you have a problem area, you can apply this temporarily to collect enough data, enabling you to implement predictive maintenance.

Local-based current industry standard

A local self-contained system is a great solution if a cloud database is not desired or allowed. Systems such as a Condition Monitoring Toolkit allow for recording of devices onto the local memory or USB drive. Additionally, multiple alarm set points can be emailed or extracted locally. This approach is best for testing existing machines to help with predictive maintenance, to improve a process, or even to prevent a failure.

All three of these options require data management and analysis to improve your processor and to remedy problematic areas. Using any of them is an opportunity to test the IIoT waters before fully diving in. Extrapolating the results into problem-solving solutions can allow you to expand IIoT to the rest of your facilities in a cost-effective manner.

IO-Link: End to Analog Sensors

With most sensors now coming out with an IO-Link output, could this mean the end of using traditional analog sensors? IO-Link is the first IO technology standard (IEC 61131-9) for communications between sensors and actuators on the lower component level.

Analog sensors

A typical analog sensor detects an external parameter, such as pressure, sound or temperature, and provides an analog voltage or current output that is proportional to its measurement. The output values are then sent out of the measuring sensor to an analog card, which reads in the samples of the measurements and converts them to a digital binary representation which a PLC/controller can use. At both ends of the conversion, on the sensor side and the analog card side, however, the quality of the transmitted value can be affected. Unfortunately, noise and electrical interferences can affect the analog signals coming out of the sensor, degrading it over the long cable run. The longer the cable, the more prone to interference on the signal. Therefore, it’s always recommended to use shielded cables between the output of the analog sensor to the analog card for the conversion. The cable must be properly shielded and grounded, so no ground loops get induced.

Also, keep in mind the resolution on the analog card. The resolution is the number of bits the card uses to digitalize the analog samples it’s getting from the sensor. There are different analog cards that provide 10-, 12-, 14-, and 16-bit value representations of the analog signal. The more digital bits represented, the more precise the measurement value.

IO-Link sensor—less interference, less expensive and more diagnostic data

With IO-Link as the sensor output, the digital conversion happens at the sensor level, before transmission. The measured signal gets fed into the onboard IO-Link chipset on the sensor where it is converted to a digital output. The digital output signal is then sent via IO-Link directly to a gateway, with an IO-Link master chipset ready to receive the data. This is done using a standard, unshielded sensor cable, which is less expensive than equivalent shielded cables. And, now the resolution of the sensor is no longer dependent on the analog card. Since the conversion to digital happens on the sensor itself, the actual engineering units of the measured value is sent directly to the IO-Link master chipset of the gateway where it can be read directly from the PLC/controller.

Plus, any parameters and diagnostics information from the sensor can also be sent along that same IO-Link signal.

So, while analog sensors will never completely disappear on older networks, IO-Link provides good reasons for their use in newer networks and machines.

To learn about the variety of IO-Link measurement sensors available, read the Automation Insights post about ways measurement sensors solve common application challenges. For more information about IO-Link and measurement sensors, visit www.balluff.com.

Automation is “Rolling Out” in the Tire Industry

Automation is everywhere in a tire plant – from the old manual plants and mid-hybrid automated plants to the newest plants with the latest automation technology all over the world.

Industry challenges

Some tire industry automation challenges are opportunities for automation suppliers and machine builders. These can vary from retrofitting old machines and designing new machines to including smarter components to bring their production into the IIoT.

Plants want to save CapX dollars on new machines, so they are looking to upgrade old ones. Tire plants are learning from the past. They are limited by their older technology, but it has been hard to upgrade and integrate new technology, so there are long-term needs for adding flexible automation on machines. This requires new processes and recommissioning machines quickly. A good example of this is the addition of a vision system to improve quality inspections.

More automation is also needed due to a lack of skilled labor in the industry combined with the desire for higher throughout. The addition of robots on the line can aid with this. Plants can also simplify their wiring by migrating away from control panel i/o/analog to an IP67 network and IO-Link master and hubs.

The use of IO-Link also allows for more continuous condition monitoring. There is an increased need for quality inspections and process improvements. Plants are collecting more data and learning how to use it and analytics (Industry 4.0, IIoT) to achieve operational excellence. Plants need more technology that supports preventive and predictive failure solutions.

Additionally, there are automation needs on new machinery as tire designs are in an evolutional growth/change period – in the electric vehicle (EV) market, for example, where rapid change is happening across all vehicle manufacturing. Smart tires are being designed using RFID and sensors embedded in the tire ply.

Successfully matching up automation products to meet plant needs first requires understanding the plant’s main processes, each with millions of dollars of automation needs.

How tires are made

    1. Raw materials logistics – raw materials are transported to the mixing and extrusion areas for processing.
    2. Mixing and extrusions – up to 30 ingredients are mixed together for a rubber blend tire.
    3. Tire components – extruded rubber ply is measured and cut to size to meet the needs of the specific tire and then loaded onto reels feeding the tire building machines.
    4. Tire build machines – tires are built in stages from the inside out. They are crated without tread and transferred to the curing press machines.
    5. Tire curing press machines – here, the “green” tires are vulcanized, a chemical process that makes the tire more durable. Tire parts are then compressed together into the final shape and tread pattern.
    6. Inspection and test machines – tires are quality tested and undergo visual, balance, force, and X-ray inspections.
    7. Logistics material handling, conveyor, ASRS, AGV – finished tires are taken to the warehouse for sorting and shipping.

In the past, not many people outside the tire industry understood the complexity and automation needs of these high volume, high quality, highly technical plants. Tires are so valuable to the safety of people using them that manufacturers must be held to the highest standards of quality. Automation and data collection help ensure this.

In the meantime, check out these futuristic tires and imagine all the automation to manufacture them.

Controls Architectures Enable Condition Monitoring Throughout the Production Floor

In a previous blog post we covered some basics about condition monitoring and the capability of smart IO-Link end-devices to provide details about the health of the system. For example, a change in vibration level could mean a failure is near.

This post will detail three different architecture choices that enable condition monitoring to add efficiency to machines, processes, and systems: in-process, stand-alone, and hybrid models.

IO-Link is the technology that enables all three of these architectures. As a quick introduction, IO-Link is a data communications technology at the device level, instead of a traditional signal communication. Because it communicates using data instead of signals, it provides richer details from sensors and other end devices. (For more on IO-Link, search the blog.)

In-process condition monitoring architecture

In some systems, the PLC or machine controller is the central unit for processing data from all of the devices associated with the machine or system, synthesizing the data with the context, and then communicating information to higher-level systems, such as SCADA systems.

The data collected from devices is used primarily for controls purposes and secondarily to collect contextual information about the health of the system/machine and of the process. For example, on an assembly line, an IO-Link photo-eye sensor provides parts presence detection for process control, as well as vibration and inclination change detection information for condition monitoring.

With an in-process architecture, you can add dedicated condition monitoring sensors. For example, a vibration sensor or pressure sensor that does not have any bearings on the process can be connected and made part of the same architecture.

The advantage of an in-process architecture for condition monitoring is that both pieces of information (process information and condition monitoring information) can be collected at the same time and conveyed through a uniform messaging schema to higher-level SCADA systems to keep temporal data together. If properly stored, this information could be used later for machine improvements or machine learning purposes.

There are two key disadvantages with this type of architecture.

First, you can’t easily scale this system up. To add additional sensors for condition monitoring, you also need to alter and validate the machine controller program to incorporate changes in the controls architecture. This programming could become time consuming and costly due to the downtime related to the upgrades.

Second, machine controllers or PLCs are primarily designed for the purposes of machine control. Burdening these devices with data collection and dissemination could increase overall cost of the machine/system. If you are working with machine builders, you would need to validate their ability to offer systems that are capable of communicating with higher-level systems and Information Technology systems.

Stand-alone condition monitoring architecture

Stand-alone architectures, also known as add-on systems for condition monitoring, do not require a controller. In their simplest form, an IO-Link master, power supply, and appropriate condition monitoring sensors are all that you need. This approach is most prevalent at manufacturing plants that do not want to disturb the existing controls systems but want to add the ability to monitor key system parameters. To collect data, this architecture relies on Edge gateways, local storage, or remote (cloud) storage systems.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The biggest advantage of this system is that it is separate from the controls system and is scalable and modular, so it is not confined by the capabilities of the PLC or the machine controller.

This architecture uses industrial-grade gateways to interface directly with information technology systems. As needs differ from machine to machine and from company to company as to what rate to collect the data, where to store the data, and when to issue alerts, the biggest challenge is to find the right partner who can integrate IT/OT systems. They also need to maintain your IT data-handling policies.

This stand-alone approach allows you to create various dashboards and alerting mechanisms that offer flexibility and increased productivity. For example, based on certain configurable conditions, the system can send email or text messages to defined groups, such as maintenance or line supervisors. You can set up priorities and manage severities, using concise, modular dashboards to give you visibility of the entire plant. Scaling up the system by adding gateways and sensors, if it is designed properly, could be easy to do.

Since this architecture is independent of the machine controls, and typically not all machines in the plant come from the same machine builders, this architecture allows you to collect uniform condition monitoring data from various systems throughout the plant. This is the main reason that stand-alone architecture is more sought after than in-process architecture.

It is important to mention here that not all of the IO-Link gateways (masters) available in the market are capable of communicating directly with the higher-level IT system.

Hybrid architectures for condition monitoring

As the name suggests, this approach offers a combination of in-process and stand-alone approaches. It uses IO-Link gateways in the PLC or machine controller-based controls architecture to communicate directly with higher-level systems to collect data for condition monitoring. Again, as in stand-alone systems, not all IO-Link gateways are capable of communicating directly with higher-level systems for data collection.

The biggest advantage of this system is that it does not burden PLCs or machine controllers with data collection. It creates a parallel path for health monitoring while devices are being used for process control. This could help you avoid duplication of devices.

When the devices are used in the controls loop for machine control, scalability is limited. By specifying IO-Link gateways and devices that can support higher-level communication abilities, you can add out-of-process condition monitoring and achieve uniformity in data collection throughout the plant even though the machines are from various machine builders.

Overall, no matter what approach is the best fit for your situation, condition monitoring can provide many efficiencies in the plant.

What is IO-Link? A Simple Explanation of the Universal Networking Standard

Famed physicist Albert Einstein once said, “If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough.” When the topic of IO-Link comes up, whether a salesperson or technical expert is doing the explaining, I always find it’s too much for the layman without a technical background to understand. To simplify this complex idea, I’ve created an analogy to something we use in our everyday lives: highways.  

Prior to the Federal Highway Act of 1956, each individual state, determined the rules of its state highway routes. This included everything from the width of the roads to the speed limits and the height of bridge underpasses — every aspect of the highways that were around at the time. This made long-distance travel and interstate commerce very difficult. It wasn’t until 1956 and the passage of President Eisenhower’s Federal Highway Act, that the rules became standard across the entire United States. Today, whether you’re in Houston, Boston or St. Louis, everything from the signage on the road to the speed limits and road markings are all the same. 

Like the standardization of national highway system, the IO-Link Consortium standardized the rules by which devices in automation communicate. Imagine your home as a controller, for example, the roads are cables, and your destination is a sensor. Driving your car to the store is analogous to a data packet traveling between the sensor and the controller.  

You follow the rules of the road, driving with a license and abiding by the speed limits, etc. Whether you’re driving a sedan, an SUV or a semitruck, you know you can reach your destination regardless of the state it’s in. IO-Link allows you to have different automation components from different suppliers, all communicating in sync unlike before, following a standard set of rules. This empowers the end user to craft a solution that fits his or her needs using sensors that communicate using the protocols set by the IO-Link Consortium. 

IO-Link Wireless – IO-Link with Even Greater Flexibility

In a previous blog entry, I discussed IO-Link SPE (Single-Pair Ethernet). SPE, in my opinion, has two great strengths compared to standard IO-Link: cable length and speed. With cable lengths of up to 100 meters and speed of 10 Mbps, compared to 20 meters and max baud rate of 230.4 Kbps, what could be out of reach?

Robots. We see robots with cabling routed either through the arm itself or tracking along the outside of the arm. Every time the robot moves, we know the conductors within these cables are deteriorating. Is there another “tool” in the IO-Link Consortiums special interest groups that can aid us? Yes, IO-Link Wireless.

Basics

Let cover the basics quickly. The architecture will contain a wireless master, wireless in terms of the connection to the IO-Link devices and wireless IO-Link devices. There is no real change to the physical connection of the IO-Link master to the controls system, just the elimination of cabling between the IO-Link master and IO-Link devices. It is perfect for a robot application.

Power

Wireless concepts are not new. When I saw the specification to IO-Link Wireless, the first question that came to mind was about powering the IO-Link devices. Luckily, we are in an age of batteries. and with the evolution of the EV market, battery technology has come a long way. This eliminates my concerns for low power devices. IO-Link was designed to bring more data back from our sensor and actuator devices, so IO-Link is perfectly suited to pass along battery diagnostics; low or failing batteries diagnostics/information should be readily available for a control and/or IIOT system. IO-Link devices with high current consumptions will still need to be wired to a power system.

Density of IO-Link Devices per IO-Link Master

Currently, with wired IO-Link masters, the most common configuration is eight IO-Link ports (i.e., 8 IO-Link devices can be connected), with the rare 16 port version. There is a huge advantage to wireless here within the IO-Link specification. One wireless IO-Link Master can contain up to 5 transmission tracks, where each transmission track can communicate to up to 8 IO-Link devices. That is 40 wireless IO-Link devices per wireless IO-Link master. There are a lot of details within the IO-Link Wireless specification that I will not even begin to discuss, but to go one layer more; within a physical area that the specification calls a “cell”, three wireless IO-Link Masters can exist, giving us a total of 120 wireless IO-Link devices occupying a designated area. We all know that wireless will come with a larger price tags, but at least there is a tradeoff of fewer masters (wired = 15 master, wireless = 3, for 120 devices).

Distance and Speed

I started this blog entry referencing the two strengths of SPE — length and speed. Here is where there is a great difference between Wireless and SPE IO-Link exists. If a wireless master is using one transmission track, the 8 IO-Link devices can be 20 meters away, equaling the standard wired architecture of IO-Link. As soon as we enable another transmission track, the maximum distance drops to 10 meters. The minimum transmission cycle time is 5 milliseconds. Still, I believe the pros of IO-Link Wireless outweigh the length restrictions.

Non-wireless IO-Link devices

Within the specification, there is the ability to have wireless bridges in the architecture. These bridge modules would contain a master IO-Link port to communicate to the standard IO-Link device, and then on the other side communicate to the wireless IO-Link master as a IO-Link Wireless device.

Applications

Obviously, robot end-efforts are the first to come to mind for a wireless solution. Food, beverage and medical applications also comes to mind. By eliminating the cabling, there is less surface area where contaminants can exist. Also, it could be used in inductive race ways, where a “pallet” moves along an inductive rail, which is supplying power, but I may not want to put a controller on each pallet. Lastly, IO-Link Wireless could be a good solution in any place where cabling is flexed and bent.

Conclusion

Does standard wired IO-Link fit every application? No. Does Single-Pair Ethernet and IO-Link Wireless? No. Thankfully, the IO-Link Consortium is giving us multiple methodologies to create our IO-Link architectures, where one application may need to encompass all three. For those applications that require fewer or the elimination of cables, the IO-Link Wireless solution can fit this space. For further information on the IO-Link specification, go to the consortium’s website at: IO-Link.com.

Continuous and Exacting Measurements Deliver New Levels of Quality Control

Quality control has always been a challenge. Going back centuries, the human eye was the only form of quality verification. Hundreds of years ago metal tools like calipers were introduced to allow for higher repeatability compared to the human eye. This method is very cumbersome and is only an approximation based off a sample of the production, potentially allowing faulty products to be used or shipped to the customer.

What is the best solution by today’s standards? By scanning the product at all times! Using continuous measurements reduces or even eliminates the production of faulty products and allows for consistent and repeatable production. This used to be an impossible task for small products, but with the invention of the laser and CMOS(Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) imaging sensors, extremely small measurements can be achieved. How small? In an industrial environment, measuring 0.3 mm components with a resolution of 10 micrometers is absolutely attainable. Using special optics to spread the beam across a window will allow for 105 mm of measuring range and up to 2 meters distance between the transmitter (laser spread light) and receiver (CMOS sensor).

Traditionally these sensor systems have one or two analog outputs and have to be scaled in the control system to be usable. These values are repeatable and accurate once scaled but there has to be a better way. IO-Link to the rescue!

IO-Link brings an enormous amount of information and flexibility to configuration. Using IO-Link will also reduce the amount of wiring and analog input cards/hubs required. The serial communications of IO-Link also reduce overall costs thanks to its use of standard cables, as opposed to shielded cables. This allows for 20 meter runs over a standard double ended M12 cables without information loss or noise injection. Another benefit to going with IO-Link is the drastic increase in bits of resolution. Analog input cards and analog input hubs tend to provide between 10-16 bits of resolution, whereas IO-Link has the ability to pass two measurements via process data in the form of dual 32 bit resolution arrays as well as more information about the status of the sensors.

With IO-Link, you also gain the ability to use system commands like restarting the device, factory reset, signal normalization, reset maintenance interval, and device discovery. With this level of technology and resolution, quality control can be taken to down to the finest details.