The Latest Trend in the Stamping and Die Industry

compact-sensor-blogOne trend we see today in many applications is the need for smaller low profile proximity sensors. Machines are getting much smaller and the need for error proofing has ultimately become a must for such applications in the Stamping and Die industry. Stamping Die processes can be a very harsh environment with excessive change overs to high speed part feed outs when running production. In many cases these applications need a sensor that can provide 5mm of sensing range however they simply do not have the room for an M18 sensor that is 45 to 50mm long. This is where the “FlatPack” low profile sensor can be a great choice due to their low profile dimensions.

Proximity sensors have proven time and time again to reduce machine crashes, part accuracy and proper part location. Sensors can be placed in multiple locations within the application to properly error proof “In Order Parts” (IO) for example detecting whether a punched hole is present or not present to ensure a production part is good. All of this adds up to reduced machine downtime and lower scrap rates that simply help a plant run more efficiently.

So when selecting proximity sensors and mating cables it is very important to select a sensor that A) mechanically fits the application and B) offers enough sensing range detection to reliably see the target without physical damage to the sensor. Remember, these sensors are proximity sensors not positive machine stops. Cables are also key to applications, it is important to pick a the proper cable needed for example an abrasion resistant cable may be needed due to excessive metal debris or a TPE cable for high flex areas.

Below both sensors have 5mm of sensing range:

M18vsFlatpack

Below both sensors have 2mm of sensing range:

M8vsFlatpack

You can see that in certain process areas “FlatPack” low profile sensors can provide benefits for applications that have space constraints.

For more information on proximity sensors click here.

Inductive Sensors for Washdown Conditions

WashdownSensorsWhen selecting the proper Inductive sensor it is very important to understand the type of application environment the sensor will be installed in. In previous posts, I have blogged about various types of sensors and how they fit into the application mix. For example, a welding application will need specific sensor features that will help combat the normal hostilities that are common to heat, weld spatter and impact due to tight tolerances within the fixture areas.

Inductive sensors are also used more and more in aggressive environments including machine tools, stamp and die, and food and beverage applications. Many times within these types of applications there are aggressive chemicals and cleaners that are part of the application process or simply part of the cleanup procedure that also
mandates high pressure wash down procedures.

So, when we have a stamping or food and beverage application that uses special oils or coolants we know a standard sensor is on borrowed time. This is where harsh environment sensors come in as they offer higher IP ratings with no LED function indicators that seals the sensor to withstand the harshest processes. They also will have high grade stainless steel housings special plated electronics along with additional O-rings making them ideal for the most hostile environment.

InductiveWashdownFeatures:

  • High grade stainless steel housing
  • No LED indicator
  • Gold plated internal contacts
  • Additional sealing O-rings
  • Increased IP ratings
  • Higher temperature ratings

For more information on inductive sensors for harsh environments you can visit the Balluff website at www.balluff.us.

High Pressure Inductive Sensors with Analog Feedback

In my previous blog post we covered the Anatomy of a High Pressure Proximity Sensor. That post covered the different mechanical housing designs and special properties that go into high pressure sensor products with discrete outputs. That is great information to know when specifying the correct sensor for a particular application. In today’s competitive market and constant goals to improve processes, sensor’s that offer continuous feedback are required.

Hydraulic systems regulate speed of an actuator by regulating flow rate. The flow rate determines the speed of the cylinder spud that actuates inside the system. For example, an analog sensor can provide measurement to the controls with indication of slowing down or speeding up the actuator based on the analog feedback from the sensor in regard to position of the tapered section of the actuator. So, if the internal target gets larger with more position movement (stroke) the distant measurement changes and indicates that the end of stroke is near causing the controller to initiate a soft stop. This provides better control of the system offering a more efficient reliable process.

500barAnalog Inductive sensors provide an absolute voltage or current signal change proportional to the distance of a ferrous target. In high pressure applications that require more position feedback, an analog distance sensor can offer a solution as they also offer high – strength stainless steel housings with special sealing designs that allow pressure up to 500 bar and 85°C temperature ratings making them an ideal solution for valve speed control and soft starts with a non – contact design.

More information on high pressure analog inductive sensors is available on the Balluff website at www.balluff.us.

Let’s Get Small: The Drive Toward Miniaturization

minisensorGoing about our hectic daily lives, we tend to just take the modern cycle of innovation for granted. But when we stop to think about it, the changes we have seen in the products we buy are astonishing. This is especially true with regard to electronics. Not only are today’s products more feature-laden, more reliable, and more functional…they are also unbelievably small.

I remember our family’s first “cell phone” back in the ’90s. It was bolted to the floor of the car, required a rooftop antenna, and was connected to the car’s electrical system for power. All it did was place and receive phone calls. Today we are all carrying around miniature pocket computers we call “smartphones,” where the telephone functionality is – in reality – just another “app”.

Again going back two decades, we had a 32″ CRT analog television that displayed standard definition and weighed over 200 pounds; it took two strong people to move it around the house. Today it’s common to find 55″ LCD high-definition digital televisions that weigh only 50 pounds and can be moved around by one person with relative ease.

LabPhotoThese are just a couple of examples from the consumer world. Similar changes are taking place in the industrial and commercial world. Motors, controllers, actuators, and drives are shrinking. Today’s industrial actuators and motion systems offer either the same speed and power with less size and weight, or are simply more compact and efficient than ever before possible.

The advent of all this product miniaturization is driving a need for equally miniaturized manufacturing and assembly processes. And that means rising demand for miniaturized industrial sensors such as inductive proximity sensors, photoelectric presence sensors, and capacitive proximity sensors.

Another thing about assembling small things: the manufacturing tolerances also get small. The demand for sensor precision increases in direct proportion to manufacturing size reduction. Fortunately, miniature sensors are also inherently precision sensors. As sensors shrink in size, their sensing behavior typically becomes more precise. In absolute terms, things like repeatability, temperature drift, and hysteresis all improve markedly as sensor size diminishes. Miniature sensors can deliver the precise, repeatable, and consistent sensing performance demanded by the field of micro-manufacturing.

For your next compact assembly project, be sure to think about the challenges of your precision sensing applications, and how you plan to deploy miniature sensors to achieve consistent and reliable operation from your process.

For more information on precision sensing visit balluff.us/minis.

Back to the Basics: How Do I Wire a DC 2-wire Sensor?

In one of my previous post we covered “How do I wire my 3-wire sensors“. This topic has had a lot of interest so I thought to myself, this would be a great opportunity to add to that subject and talk about DC 2-wire sensors. Typically in factory automation applications 2 or 3 wire sensors are implemented within the process, and as you know from my prior post a 3 wire sensor has the following 3 wires; a power wire, a ground wire and a switch wire.

A 2-wire sensor of course only has 2 wires including a power wire and ground wire with connection options of Polarized and Non-Polarized. A Polarized option requires the power wire to be connected to the positive (+) side and the ground wire to be connected to the negative side (-) of the power supply. The Non-Polarized versions can be wired just as a Polarized sensor however they also have the ability to be wired with the ground wire (-) to the positive side and the power wire (+) to the negative side of the power supply making this a more versatile option as the sensor can be wired with the wires in a non – specific location within the power supply and controls.

In the wiring diagrams below you will notice the different call outs for the Polarized vs. Non-Polarized offerings.

PolarizedDiagramsnon-polarized diagramsNote: (-) Indication of Non-Polarized wiring.

While 3-wire sensors are a more common option as they offer very low leakage current, 2 wire offerings do have their advantages per application. They can be wired in a sinking (NPN) or sourcing (PNP) configuration depending on the selected load location. Also keep in mind they only have 2 wires simplifying connection processes.

For more information on DC 2- Wire sensors click here.

There’s more than just one miniature sensor technology

As I discussed in my last blog post, there is a need for miniature, precision sensors. However, finding the right solution for a particular application can be a difficult process. Since every sensor technology has its own strengths and weaknesses, it is vital to have a variety of different sensor options to choose from.

The good news is that there are several different technologies to consider in the miniature, precision sensor world. Here we will briefly look at three technologies: photoelectric, capacitive, and inductive. Together these three technologies have the ability to cover a wide range of applications.

Photoelectric Sensors

MiniPhotoelectricPhotoelectric sensors use a light emitter and receiver to detect the presence or absence of an object. This type of sensor comes in different styles for flexibility in sensing. A through-beam photoelectric is ideal for long range detection and small part detection. Whereas a diffuse photoelectric is ideal for applications where space is limited or in applications where sensing is only possible from one side.

Miniature photoelectric sensors come with either the electronics fully integrated into the sensor or as a sensor with separate electronics in a remote amplifier.

Capacitive Sensors

MiniCapacitiveCapacitive sensors use the electrical property of capacitance and work by measuring changes in this electrical property as an object enters its sensing field. Capacitive sensors detect the presence or absence of virtually any object with any material, from metals to powders to liquids. It also has the ability to sense through a plastic or glass container wall to detect proper fill level of the material inside the container.

Miniature capacitive sensors come with either the electronics fully integrated into the sensor or as a sensor with separate electronics in a remote amplifier.

Inductive Sensors

MiniInductiveInductive sensors use a coil and oscillator to create a magnetic field to detect the presence or absence of any metal object. The presence of a metal object in the sensing field dampens the oscillation amplitude. This type of sensor is, of course, ideal for detecting metal objects.

Miniature inductive sensors come with the electronics fully integrated into the sensor.

One sensor technology isn’t enough since there isn’t a single technology that will work across all applications. It’s good to have options when looking for an application solution.

To learn more about these technologies, visit www.balluff.us

Do’s and Don’ts For Applying Inductive Prox Sensors

Inductive proximity sensor face damage
Example of proximity sensor face damage

In my last post (We Don’t Make Axes Out of Bronze Anymore) we discussed the evolution of technologies which brought up the question, can a prox always replace a limit switch?  Not always.  Note that most proxes cannot directly switch large values of current, for example enough to start a motor, operate a large relay, or power up a high-wattage incandescent light.   Being electronic devices, most standard proxes cannot handle very high temperatures, although specialized hi-temp versions are available.

A prox is designed to be a non-contact device.  That is, it should be installed so that the target does not slam into or rub across the sensing face.  If the application is very rough and the spacing difficult to control, a prox with more sensing range should be selected.  Alternately, the prox could be “bunkered” or flush-mounted inside a heavy, protective bracket.  The target can pound on the bunker continuously, but the sensor remains safely out of harm’s way.

If direct contact with a sensor absolutely cannot be avoided, ruggedized metal-faced sensors are available that are specifically designed to handle impacts on the active surface.

Be sure to consider ambient conditions of the operating environment.  High temperature was mentioned earlier, but other harsh conditions such as disruptive electrical welding fields or high-pressure wash-down can be overcome by selecting proxes specially designed to survive and thrive in these environments.

Operationally, another thing to consider is the target material.  Common mild carbon steel is the ideal target for an inductive prox and will yield the longest sensing ranges with standard proxes.  Other metals such as aluminum, brass, copper, and stainless steel have different material properties that reduce the sensing range of a standard prox.  In these cases be sure to select a Factor 1 type proximity sensor, which can sense all metals at the same range.

We Don’t Make Axes Out of Bronze Anymore

Every technology commonly in use today exists for a reason.   Technologies have life cycles: they are invented out of necessity and are often widely used as the best available solution to a given technical problem.  For example, at one time bronze was the best available metallurgy for making long-lasting tools and weapons, and it quickly replaced copper as the material of choice.  But later on, bronze was itself replaced by iron, steel, and ultimately stainless steel.

When it comes to detecting the presence of an object, such as a moving component on a piece of machinery, the dominant technology used to be electro-mechanical limit switches.  Mechanical & electrical wear and tear under heavy industrial use led to unsatisfactory long-term reliability.  What was needed was a way to switch electrical control signal current without mechanical contact with the target – and without arcing & burning across electrical contacts.

Example of an inductive proximity sensor
Example of an inductive proximity sensor

Enter the invention of the all-electronic inductive proximity sensor.  With no moving parts and solid-state transistorized switching capability, the inductive proximity sensor solved the two major drawbacks of industrial limit switches (mechanical & electrical wear) in a single, rugged device.  The inductive proximity sensor – or “prox” for short – detects the presence of metallic targets by interpreting changes in the high-frequency electro-magnetic field emanating from its face or “active surface”.  The metal of the target disrupts the field; the sensor responds by electronically switching its output ON (target present) or OFF (target not present). The level of switched current is typically in the 200mA DC range, which is enough to trigger a PLC input or operate a small relay.

In my next post, I will explain the do’s and don’ts for applying inductive prox sensors.

Inductive Sensor Correction Factor

Some applications have multiple materials that have to be detected. When specifying a standard inductive proximity sensor the first question asked is, “what is the target material that will need to be detected.” In my previous post, I indicated that the ideal target for an inductive sensor is a target made from mild steel. This is correct; however, an inductive sensor can also detect non-ferrous materials but a correction factor has to be determined into the rated operating distance of your selected sensor. For example, if you select a sensor that has 4mm of operating distance (Rated Operating Distance), and the target is aluminum, we would multiply a correction factor of 0.30-0.45 to get the new rated operating distance of your sensor (1.2mm -1.8mm). Due to the aluminum’s non-ferrous material we can no longer achieve the 4mm rated operating distance in proximity to the aluminum target.

Continue reading “Inductive Sensor Correction Factor”

Back to the Basics – How do I wire my 3-wire sensors?

Three-wire sensors are used in various applications from detecting parts to locating position of the actual machine. They can come in all different technologies such as inductive, photoelectric and capacitive, just to list a few. Although the sensor technology may differ, all 3-wire sensors are wired the same.A three-wire sensor has 3 wires present. Two power wires and one load wire. The power wires will connect to a power supply and the remaining wire to some type of load. The load is a device that is being controlled by the sensor. The most common type of load would be a PLC (programmable logic controller) DC input. Other examples of a load could be a relay or machine alarm, just make sure the load rating of the sensor is not exceeded. A typical 3-wire DC sensor’s output has a rating of 100mA to 200mA.

Continue reading “Back to the Basics – How do I wire my 3-wire sensors?”