Operational Excellence – How Can We Apply Best Practices Within the Weld Shop?

Reducing manufacturing costs is absolutely a priority within the automotive manufacturing industry. To help reduce costs there has been and continues to be pressure to lower MRO costs on high volume consumables such as inductive proximity sensors.

Traditionally within the MRO community, the strategy has been to drive down the unit cost of components from their suppliers year over year to ensure reduce costs as much as possible. Of course, cost optimization is important and should continue to be, but factors other than unit cost should be considered. Let’s explore some of these as it would apply to inductive proximity sensors in the weld shop.

Due to the aggressive manufacturing environment within weld cell, devices such as inductive proximity sensors are subjected to a variety of hostile factors such as high temperature, impact damage, high EMF (electromagnetic fields) and weld spatter. All of these factors drastically reduce the life of these devices.

There are  manufacturing costs associated with a failed device well beyond that of the unit cost of the device itself. These real costs can be and are reflected in incremental premium costs such as increased downtime (both planned and unplanned),  poor asset allocation, indirect inventory, expedited freight, outsourcing costs, overtime, increased manpower, higher scrap levels, and sorting & rework costs. All of these factors negatively affect a facility’s Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE).

Root Cause

In selection of inductive proximity sensors for the weld manufacturing environment there are root cause misconceptions and poor responses to the problem. Responses include: leave the sensor, mounting and cable selection up to the machine builder; bypass the failed sensor and keep running production until the failed device can be replaced; install multiple vending machines in the plant to provide easier access to spare parts (replace sensors often to reduce unplanned downtime);  and the sensors are going to fail anyway so just buy the cheapest device possible.

None of these address the root cause of the failure. They mask the root cause and exacerbate the scheduled and unscheduled downtime or can cause serious part contamination issues down stream, resulting in enormous penalties from their customer.

So, how can we implement a countermeasure to help us drive out these expensive operating costs?

  • Sensor Mounting – Utilize a fixed mounting system that will allow a proximity sensor to slide into perfect mounting position with a positive stop to prevent the device from being over extended and being struck by the work piece. This mounting system should have a weld spatter protective coating to reduce the adherence of weld spatter. This will also provide extra impact protection and a thermal barrier to further assist in protecting the sensing device asset.
  • The Sensor – Utilize a robust fully weld protective coated stainless steel body and face proximity sensor. For applications with the sensor in an “on state” during the weld cycle and/or to detect non-ferrous utilize a proper weld protective coated Factor 1 (F1) device.
  • Cabling – A standard cable will not withstand a weld environment such as MIG welding. Even a cable with protective tubing can have open areas vulnerable for weld berries to land and cause burn through on the cables resulting in a dead short. A proper weld sensor cord set with protective coating on the lock nut, high temp rated and weld resistant overmold to a weld resistant jacketed cable should be used.

By implementing a weld best practice total solution as described above, you will realize significant increases in your facilities OEE contributing to the profitability and sustainability of your organization.

Ask these 3 simple questions:

1) What is the frequency of failure

2) What is the Mean Time To Repair (MTTR)

3) What is the cost per minute of downtime.

Once you have that information you will know with your own metrics  what the problem is costing your facility by day/month/year. You may be surprised to see how much of a financial burden these issues are costing you. Investing in the correct best practice assets will allow you to realize immediate results to boost your company OEE.

How to keep prox sensors from latching on

For inductive proximity sensors to operate in a stable manner, without constant “chatter” or switching on/off rapidly close to the switching point, they require some degree of hysteresis.

Hysteresis, basically, is the distance between the switch-on point and the switch-off point when the target is moving away from the active surface. Typical values are stated in sensor data sheets; common values would be ≤ 15%, ≤ 10%, ≤ 5% and so on. The value is taken as a percentage of the actual switch-on distance of the individual sensor specimen. Generally, the higher the percentage of hysteresis, the more stable the sensor is and the farther away the target must move to turn off the sensor.

basic_oper_inductive_sensorBut occasionally, a sensor will remain triggered after the target has been removed. This condition is called “latching on” and it typically occurs when the sensor remains damped enough to hold the sensor in the “on” condition.

Some factors that could cause “latching on” behavior and ways to correct it are:

Having too much metal near the sensor
Using a quasi-flush, non-flush, or extended-range sensor that is too close to metal surrounding its sides will partially dampen the sensor. While it is not enough to turn the sensor on, it is enough to hold it in the on state due to hysteresis. If there is a lot of metal close to the sides of the sensor, a flush-type sensor may eliminate the latching-on problem, although it will have shorter range.

Having the mounting nuts too close to the sensor face
of a quasi-flush, non-flush, or extended-range sensor. Even though there are threads in that area, the mounting nuts can pre-damp the sensor.

Using a sensor that is not stable at higher temperatures
Some sensors are more susceptible to latching-on than others as temperature is increased. This is caused by temperature drift, which can increase the sensor’s sensitivity to metals. In these cases, the sensor may work fine at start-up or at room temperature, but as the machinery gets hot it will start latching on. The solution is to make sure that the sensor is rated for the ambient temperature in the application. Another option: look for sensors designed properly by a reputable manufacturer or choose sensors specifically designed to work at higher temperatures.

Having strong magnetic fields
This happens because the magnetic field oversaturates the coil, so that the sensor is unable to detect that the target has been removed. If this is the case, replace them with weld-field-immune or weld-field-tolerant sensors.

inductive-proximity-sensor-cutaway-with-annotation

For a more detailed description of how inductive proximity sensors detect metallic objects without contact, please take a look at this related blog post.

 

Back to the Basics: Measuring

In the last post about the Basics of Automation, we discussed how objects can be detected, collected and positioned with the help of sensors. Now, let’s take a closer look at how non-contact measurement—both linear and rotary—works to measure distance, travel, angle, and pressure.

Measuring travel, distance, position, angle and pressure are common tasks in automation. The measuring principles used are as varied as the different tasks.

Sensor Technologies

  • Magnetostrictive enables simultaneous measurement of multiple positions and can be used in challenging environments.
  • Magnet coded enables the highest accuracy and real-time measurement.
  • Inductive is used for integration in extremely tight spaces and is suitable for short distances.
  • Photoelectric features flexible range and is unaffected by the color or surface properties of the target object.

Different Sensors for Different Applications

Distance measurement

Janni1Disc brakes are used at various locations
in wind power plants. With their durability and precise measurement, inductive distance sensors monitor these brake discs continuously and provide a timely warning if the brake linings need to be changed.

In winding and unwinding equipment, a photoelectric sensor continuously measures the increasing or decreasing roll diameter. This means the rolls can be changed with minimal stoppages.

Linear position measurement

Janni4Workpieces are precisely positioned on the slide of a linear axis. This allows minimal loss of production time while ensuring quality. Magnetic encoders installed along the linear axis report the actual slide position to the controller (PLC) continuously and in real time — even when the slide is moving at a speed of up to 10 m/s.

In a machine tool the clamping state of a spindle must be continuously monitored during machining. This improves results on the workpiece and increases the reliability of the overall system. Inductive positioning systems provide continuous feedback to the controller: whether the spindle is unclamped, clamped with a tool or clamped without a tool.

Rotational position measurement

Janni5Workpieces such as a metal plate are printed, engraved or cut on a cut/print machine. This demands special accuracy in positioning it on the machine. Magnetic encoders on both rotating axes of the machine measure the position of the workpiece and ensure an even feed rate.

In a parabolic trough system,
sunlight is concentrated on parabolic troughs using parabolic mirrors allowing the heat energy to be stored. To achieve the optimal energy efficiency, the position of the parabolic mirror must be guided to match the sun’s path. Inclination sensors report the actual position of the parabolic mirror to the controller, which then adjusts as needed.

Pressure and Level Measurement

Janni7Consistently high surface quality of the machined workpiece must be ensured in a machine tool. This requires continuous monitoring of the coolant feed system pressure. Pressure sensors can reliably monitor the pressure and shut down the machine within a few milliseconds when the defined pressure range is violated.

Janni8In many tanks and vats, the fill height of the liquid must be continually measured. This is accomplished using ultrasonic sensors, which note levels regardless of color, transparency or surface composition of the medium. These sensors detect objects made of virtually any material (even sound-absorbing) including liquids, granulates and powders.

Stay tuned for future posts that will cover the essentials of automation. To learn more about the Basics of Automation in the meantime, visit www.balluff.com.

Where Discrete Position Sensing Belongs in the Manufacturing Process

Unlike continuous position sensors which provide near real-time position feedback throughout the stroke of the cylinder, discrete position sensors are equipped with a switching functionality at one or more designated positions along the cylinder’s stroke. Typically, these positions are set to detect fully retracted and extended positions but one can also be used to detect mid-stroke position.

To determine which is right for you requires a review of your application and a determination of how precisely the movement of the cylinder needs to be controlled. Some hydraulic cylinder applications require no position sensing at all. These applications simply use the cylinder to move a load, and position control is either done manually or by some other external switch or stop. Moving up a step, many applications require only that the beginning and end of the cylinder stroke be detected so that the cylinder can be commanded to reverse direction. These applications are ideal for discrete position sensing.

Several types of sensors are used for discrete position detection, but one of the most common is high-pressure inductive proximity sensors, which are installed into the end caps of the cylinder. The sensors detect the piston as it reaches the end of the cylinder stroke in either direction.

These sensors are designed to withstand the full pressure of the hydraulic system. Inductive sensors are extremely reliable because they operate without any form of mechanical contact and are completely unaffected by changes in oil temperature or viscosity.

High-pressure
High-pressure inductive sensors installed in hydraulic cylinder

Discrete position sensors are used in applications such as hydraulic clamps, detection of open/closed position in welding operations, and in hydraulic compactors and balers for compacting materials until end of cylinder stroke is reached, at which point the cylinder retracts.

Additionally, it is quite common for pneumatically-actuated clamps and grippers to use discrete sensors to indicate fully extended and fully retracted positions, and in many cases, in-between positions as well. There are even applications where multiple discrete sensors are used in grippers for gauging and sizing work pieces.

By far, the most common method of providing discrete position in an air cylinder is to use externally-mounted switches that react to a magnet installed around the circumference of the piston. These magnetically-actuated switches can sense the field of a magnet embedded in the cylinder’s piston through the aluminum body of the cylinder.

magnetically actuated
Magnetically actuated sensor installed into cylinder C-slot

There are several different operating principles used in these magnetically-actuated switches, ranging from simple, low-cost reed switches and Hall-effect switches to significantly more reliable sensors that use magnetoresistive technology. One of the big advantages of magnetoresistive sensors is that they will reliably detect both radial and axial magnetic fields, making them ideal replacements for reed or Hall-effect switches.

Check out our previous blog to learn more about continuous position sensors.

Distance Measurement with Inductive Sensors

When we think about inductive sensors we automatically refer to discrete output offerings that detect the presence of ferrous materials. This can be a production part or an integrated part of the machine to simply determine position. Inductive sensors have been around for a long time, and there will always be a need for them in automated assembly lines, weld cells and stamping presses.

We often come across applications where we need an analog output at short range that needs to detect ferrous materials. This is an ideal application for an analog inductive proximity sensor that can offer an analog voltage or analog current output. This can reliably measure or error proof different product features such as varying shapes and sizes. Analog inductive sensors are pure analog devices that maintain a very good resolution with a high repeat accuracy. Similar to standard inductive sensors, they deal very well with vibration, commonly found in robust applications. Analog inductive proximity sensors are also offered in many form factors from M12-M30 tubular housings, rectangular block style and flat housings. They can also be selected to have flush or non-flush mounting features to accommodate specific operating distances needed in various applications.

Application Examples:

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For more specific information on analog inductive sensors visit www.balluff.com.

Reliable Part Exit/Part-Out Detection

Walk into any die shop in the US and nine out of ten times, we discover diffuse reflective sensors being used to detect a large part or a small part exiting a die. Many people have success using this methodology, but lubrication-covered tumbling parts can create challenges for diffuse-reflective photoelectric sensing devices for many reasons:

  1. Tumbling parts with many “openings” on the part itself can cause a miss-detected component.
  2. Overly-reflective parts can false triggering of the output.
  3. Dark segments of the exiting part can cause light absorption. Remember, a diffuse sensors sensing distance is based on reflectivity. Black or dark targets tend to absorb light and not reflect light back to the receiver.
  4. Die lube/misting can often fog over a photoelectric lens requiring maintenance or machine down time.

The solution: Super Long Range Inductive Sensors placed under chutes

Most metal forming personnel are very familiar with smaller versions of inductive proximity sensors in tubular sizes ranging from 3mm through 30mm in diameter and with square or “block style” inductive types (flat packs, “pancake types”, etc.) but it is surprising how many people are just now discovering “Super Long Range Inductive Proximity” types. Super Long Range Inductive Proximity Sensors have been used in metal detection applications for many years including Body-In-White Automotive applications, various segments of steel processing and manufacturing, the canning industry, and conveyance.

Benefits of Using A UHMW Chute + Super Long Range Inductive Proximity Sensor in Part Exit/Part-Out Applications:

  1. It is stronger and quieter than parts flowing over a metal chute, readily available in standard and custom widths, lengths and thicknesses to fit the needs of large and small part stampers everywhere.
  2. UHMW is reported to be 3X stronger than carbon steel.
  3. UHMW is resistant to die lubes.
  4. UHMW allows Super Long Range Inductive Proximity Sensors to be placed underneath and to be “tuned” to fit the exact zone dimension required to detect any part exiting the die (fixed ranges and tunable with a potentiometer). The sensing device is also always out of harm’s way.
  5. Provides an option for part detection in exiting applications that eliminates potential problems experienced in certain metal forming applications where photoelectric sensing solutions aren’t performing optimally.
A Two-Out Die with Metallic Chute
A Two-Out Die with Metallic Chute

Not every Part Exit/Part-Out application is the same and not every die, stamping application, vintage of equipment, budget for sensing programs are the same. But it’s important to remember in the world of stamping, to try as consistently as possible to think application specificity when using sensors.  That is, putting the right sensing system in the right place to get the job done and to have as many technical options available as possible to solve application needs in your own “real world” metal forming operation.  We believe the UHMW + Super Long Range Inductive System is such an option.

You can learn more in the video below or by visiting www.balluff.us.

Reed Switches vs. Magnetoresistive Sensors (GMR)

In a previous post we took a look at magnetic field sensors vs inductive proximity sensors for robot grippers. In this post I am going to dive a little deeper into magnetic field sensors and compare two technologies: reed switches, and magnetoresistive sensors (GMR).

Reed Switches

PrintThe simplest magnetic field sensor is the reed switch. This device consists of two flattened ferromagnetic nickel and iron reed elements, enclosed in a hermetically sealed glass tube. As an axially aligned magnet approaches, the reed elements attract the magnetic flux lines and draw together by magnetic force, thus completing an electrical circuit.

While there are a few advantages of this technology like low cost and high noise immunity, those can be outweighed by the numerous disadvantages. These switches can be slow, are prone to failure, and are sensitive to vibration. Additionally, they react only to axially magnetized magnets and require high magnet strength.

Magnetoresistive Sensors (GMR)

PrintThe latest magnetic field sensing technology is called giant magnetoresistive (GMR). Compared to Reed Switches GMR sensors have a more robust reaction to the presence of a magnetic field due to their high sensitivity, less physical chip material is required to construct a practical GMR magnetic field sensor, so GMR sensors can be packaged in much smaller housings for applications such as short stroke cylinders.

GMR sensors have quite a few advantages over reed switches. GMR sensors react to both axially and radially magnetized magnets and also require low magnetic strength. Along with their smaller physical size, these sensors also have superior noise immunity, are vibration resistant. GMR sensors also offer protection against overload, reverse polarity, and short circuiting.

Basic Sensors for Robot Grippers

Robot gripper with inductive proximity sensors mounted
Robot gripper with inductive proximity sensors mounted

Typically when we talk about end-of-arm tooling we are discussing how to make robot grippers smarter and more efficient. We addressed this topic in a previous blog post, 5 Tips on Making End-of-Arm Tooling Smarter. In this post, though, we are going to get back to the basics and talk about two options for robot grippers: magnetic field sensors, and inductive proximity sensors.

One of the basic differences is that detection method that each solution utilizes. Magnetic field sensors use an indirect method by monitoring the mechanism that moves the jaws, not the jaws themselves. Magnetic field sensors sense magnets internally mounted on the gripper mechanism to indicate the open or closed position. On the other hand, inductive proximity sensors use a direct method that monitors the jaws by detecting targets placed directly in the jaws. Proximity sensors sense tabs on moving the gripper jaw mechanism to indicate a fully open or closed position.

BMF_Grippers
Robot gripper with magnetic field sensors mounted

Additionally, each solution offers its own advantages and disadvantages. Magnetic field sensors, for example, install directly into extruded slots on the outside of the cylinder, can detect an extremely short piston stroke, and offer wear-free position detection. On the other side of the coin, the disadvantages of magnetic field sensors for this application are the necessity of a magnet to be installed in the piston which also requires that the cylinder walls not be magnetic. Inductive proximity sensors allow the cylinder to be made of any material and do not require magnets to be installed. However, proximity sensors do require more installation space, longer setup time, and have other variables to consider.

The Latest Trend in the Stamping and Die Industry

compact-sensor-blogOne trend we see today in many applications is the need for smaller low profile proximity sensors. Machines are getting much smaller and the need for error proofing has ultimately become a must for such applications in the Stamping and Die industry. Stamping Die processes can be a very harsh environment with excessive change overs to high speed part feed outs when running production. In many cases these applications need a sensor that can provide 5mm of sensing range however they simply do not have the room for an M18 sensor that is 45 to 50mm long. This is where the “FlatPack” low profile sensor can be a great choice due to their low profile dimensions.

Proximity sensors have proven time and time again to reduce machine crashes, part accuracy and proper part location. Sensors can be placed in multiple locations within the application to properly error proof “In Order Parts” (IO) for example detecting whether a punched hole is present or not present to ensure a production part is good. All of this adds up to reduced machine downtime and lower scrap rates that simply help a plant run more efficiently.

So when selecting proximity sensors and mating cables it is very important to select a sensor that A) mechanically fits the application and B) offers enough sensing range detection to reliably see the target without physical damage to the sensor. Remember, these sensors are proximity sensors not positive machine stops. Cables are also key to applications, it is important to pick a the proper cable needed for example an abrasion resistant cable may be needed due to excessive metal debris or a TPE cable for high flex areas.

Below both sensors have 5mm of sensing range:

M18vsFlatpack

Below both sensors have 2mm of sensing range:

M8vsFlatpack

You can see that in certain process areas “FlatPack” low profile sensors can provide benefits for applications that have space constraints.

For more information on proximity sensors click here.

Inductive Sensors for Washdown Conditions

WashdownSensorsWhen selecting the proper Inductive sensor it is very important to understand the type of application environment the sensor will be installed in. In previous posts, I have blogged about various types of sensors and how they fit into the application mix. For example, a welding application will need specific sensor features that will help combat the normal hostilities that are common to heat, weld spatter and impact due to tight tolerances within the fixture areas.

Inductive sensors are also used more and more in aggressive environments including machine tools, stamp and die, and food and beverage applications. Many times within these types of applications there are aggressive chemicals and cleaners that are part of the application process or simply part of the cleanup procedure that also
mandates high pressure wash down procedures.

So, when we have a stamping or food and beverage application that uses special oils or coolants we know a standard sensor is on borrowed time. This is where harsh environment sensors come in as they offer higher IP ratings with no LED function indicators that seals the sensor to withstand the harshest processes. They also will have high grade stainless steel housings special plated electronics along with additional O-rings making them ideal for the most hostile environment.

InductiveWashdownFeatures:

  • High grade stainless steel housing
  • No LED indicator
  • Gold plated internal contacts
  • Additional sealing O-rings
  • Increased IP ratings
  • Higher temperature ratings

For more information on inductive sensors for harsh environments you can visit the Balluff website at www.balluff.us.