Inductive Coupling: A Simple Solution for Replacing Slip Rings

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Figure 1: Inductive coupling for power and data exchange

In the industrial automation space, inductive sensors have grown very popular , most commonly used for detecting the proximity of metal objects such as food cans, or machine parts. Inductive coupling, also known as non-contact connectors, uses magnetic induction to transfer power and data over an air gap.

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Figure 2: Slip ring example

While inductive couplers have many uses, one of the most beneficial is for replacing a traditional slip-ring mechanism. Slip-rings, also known as rotary connectors, are typically used in areas of a machine where one part rotates, and another part of the machine remains stationary, such as a turn table where stations on the indexing table need power and I/O, but the table rotates a full 360°. This set up makes standard cable solutions ineffective.

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Figure 3: Inductive coupling replacing the slip-ring

A slip ring could be installed at the base of the table, but since they are electromechanical devices, they are subject to wear out. And unfortunately, the signs for wearing are not evident and often it is only a lack of power that alerts workers to an issue.

An inductive coupling solution eliminates all the hassle of the mechanical parts. With non-contact inductive coupling, the base of a coupler could be mounted at the base of the table and the remote end could be mounted on the rotating part of the table.

Additionally, slip rings are susceptible to noise and vibration, but because inductive couplers do not have contact between the base and the remote, they do not have this problem.

Inductive couplers are typically IP67-rated, meaning they are not affected by dirt or water, or  vibrations, and most importantly, they are contact free so no maintenance is necessary.

Learn more about Balluff inductive couplers www.balluff.us.

You have options when it comes to connecting your sensors

When it comes to connecting I/O in factory automation settings, there are many options one can choose to build an efficient and cost-effective system. This is one area where you can reduce costs while also boosting productivity.

Single Ended Cables and Hardwired I/O

It is common in the industry for single ended cables to be run from sensors to a controller input card in a centralized control cabinet. And while this method works, it can be costly for a number of reasons, including:

  • Flying leads on single ended cables are time consuming to prepare and wire
  • Wiring mistakes are often made leading to more time troubleshooting
  • I/O Cards for PLCs are expensive
  • Long cable runs to a centralized location add up quickly especially when dealing with analog devices which require expensive shielded cables
  • Lack of scalability and diagnostics

Double Ended Cables and Networked I/O

Using double ended cables along with network I/O blocks allows for a cost-effective solution to distribute I/O and increase up time. There are numerous benefits that come along with this sort of architecture. Some of these benefits are:

  • Reduced cabling — since I/O is distributed, only network cables need to be run back to the control cabinet reducing cost and cabinet size, and sensor cables are shortened since I/O blocks are machine mounted
  • Quicker build time since standard wiring is less labor intensive
  • Diagnostics allows for quicker trouble shooting, leading to lower maintenance costs and reduced downtime

IO-Link

Using IO-Link delivers all of the strengths of networked I/O as well as additional benefits:

  • I/O Hubs allow for scalability
  • Smart devices can be incorporated into your system
  • Parameterization capability
  • Increased diagnostics from intelligent devices
  • Reduced costs and downtime
  • Increased productivity

Inductive Coupling for non-contact connection

Many people are using inductive coupling technology to provide a non-contact connection for their devices. This method allows you to pass both power and signal across an air gap making it ideal for replacing slip rings or multi-pin connectors in many applications. This provides some great options for industry to gain benefits in these areas such as:

  • Reduced wear since there is no physical connection
  • Faster change over
  • Reduced downtime due to the elimination of damaged connector pins

For more information on connectivity and I/O architecture solutions please visit www.balluff.com.

Recap of our top 5 posts of 2015

goodbye-2015-hello-2016As we wrap up the old and begin to open up the new, let’s take a moment to reflect on what this past year has brought us.  Apart from the triumphs and the hard lost battles, we want to bring you some of our top posts from 2015.  These posts are as follows:

#5: 5 Tips on Making End-of-Arm Tooling Smarter

Everyone wants their robot to work faster, smarter, and more efficiently.  In this post we review five easy tips to help you improve the efficiency of your end-of-arm tooling.

Example of discrete sensors used to detect tank level
Example of discrete sensors used to detect tank level

#4: Liquid Level Sensing: Detect or Monitor

Who doesn’t like complicated concepts broken down into easy to understand terminology? In this post we break down the differences between point level detection and continuous position sensing as well as provide you with technologies to put into practice.

#3: How Can I Convince My Boss to Send Me to Training?

As Aristotle once said “All men (and women) by nature desire knowledge.”  Here we are giving you the tools needed to break down the barriers your boss (or you) might have against investing in training.

#2: Back to the Basics: How Do I Wire a 2-Wire Sensor?

So you just got a brand spanking new 2-wire sensor for the holidays but you realize you don’t know exactly what wire goes where.  In this post we make wiring that bad boy easy and even break down what polarized and non-polarized mean.

So we have covered four of the top posts from 2015, are you ready for the number one post from the past year? So are we! And we will have it for you right after a quick message from our sponsors! (just kidding!)

power&dataexchange#1: Inductive Coupling – Simple Concept for Complex Automation

Through the use of magnetic induction, we are able to reduce the downtime of a machine due to the failure of a slip ring.  Inductive couplers pass power and data over an air gap creating a maintenance free, non-contact environment to operate a variety of machinery.

We want to thank you for the wonderful year that is behind us and be sure to be on the look-out for even more exciting news to come this year!

Non-contact Power & Data Exchange For Assembly Automation

InductiveCouplersAssembly automation has evolved multi-fold since Ford’s first linear assembly plant. Assembly automation is of course commonly found in Automotive or heavy industries but it has found its way in small parts assembly, consumer goods and other industries that are embracing automation full on.

Typically, in assembly automation, pallets of sub-assemblies travel along the conveyor maze making stops at various stations to get further components and assemblies put on or some kind of operation is being performed on them.

Several times, inspection, measurement or other process specifics demand sensors and actuators to be on-board these pallets. A very common challenge people face in this environment is to provide power and communicate with this traveling assembly. Pin based automatic couplers and/ or manual intervention is common solution. As explained in my previous blog “Inductive Coupling for Robotic End Effectors” the pin based coupling has downfall of being susceptible to environmental elements and mechanical wear. Thus, offering a solution that requires some regular maintenance and related downtime. Manual intervention for inspection or measurement is of course time consuming and laborious activity.

Non-contact inductive coupling offers great benefits in this scenario. Typically, the base (transmitter) is mounted along the conveyor and the remote (receiver) is mounted on the moving pallets. As the pallet moves along the assembly line, the remote, when in-zone of the base, receives power and exchanges data over small air-gap with the base unit. There are three major benefits of this approach

  1. Because of magnetic induction phenomenon, these non-contact couplers are immune to dust, humidity, oil or vibrations, unlike the pin based couplers.
  2. Misalignment tolerance: Inductive couplers do not need to be in exact axial or angular alignment. They can tolerate angular or axial offsets. The amount of offset they can tolerate depends on the particulars but typically 10-20° angular offset is acceptable. So over-time when the conveyor system develops some slag, the inductive couplers won’t fail you that easily.
  3. Scalability: Inductive couplers come in various form factors and functionality that includes Power-only, input only, analog, configurable channels of inputs and outputs, and with IO-Link bi-directional communication. IO-Link inductive couplers offer the greatest benefits as they allow exchanging up to 32bytes of data bi-directionally- so in future if the I/O needs grow for your pallets, it can be easily handled.

You can always learn more about inductive couplers on Balluff’s website at www.balluff.us. You can also learn more in our Basics overview.

Inductive coupling – simple concept for complex automation

Inductive coupling is not new to automation. The concept in various forms has been around for over few decades. It was not actively used, and my guess is that more than form factor or functionality of couplers, it has to do with automation technology relying on mechanical and hard wired components. With growing complexity and ever evolving technology, the inductive coupling has also evolved.  Nowadays, you can charge your smart phones or tablets using the charging pad that uses the very same technology.

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Figure 1: Inductive coupling for power and data exchange

In industrial automation space, inductive sensors are very popular and commonly used for detecting proximity of metal objects such as food cans, or machine parts. Inductive coupling uses magnetic induction to transfer power and data over an air gap. Yes, it is a kind of very short range wireless technology that also enables power transfer.

SlipRing
Figure 2: Slip ring example

In this series of blogs on inductive coupling, we can explore various use cases of inductive coupling in complex automation. Today, let’s see how inductive coupling compares with traditional slip-ring mechanism.

Slip-rings, also known as rotary connectors, are typically used in areas of the machine where one part rotates and other part of the machine remains stationary. For example, an indexing table or turn table where stations on the indexing table need power and I/O but the table rotates through full 360°, hence standard cable solutions are ineffective. A slip ring could be installed at the base of the table.

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Figure 3: Inductive coupling replacing the slip-ring

Since, slip rings are electromechanical devices, in the long term they are subject to wearing out. Unfortunately, the signs of wear are not evident unless one day there is no power to the table. An inductive coupling solution eliminates all the hassle of the mechanical parts. With non-contact inductive coupling, the base coupler could be mounted at the base of the table and the remote coupler could be mounted on the rotating part of the table. Slip rings are susceptible to noise and vibration because they are electromechanical devices, whereas inductive couplers are not because there is no contact between the base and the remote.  In fact, the turn table shown above uses an inductive coupler.

Inductive coupler, typically have IP67 rating for the housing are not affected by dirt or water, are immune to vibrations, and most important they are contact free so no maintenance is required unless you hammer one out. Learn more about Balluff inductive couplers: www.balluff.us.