The goal is to reduce waste. Why, then, are we adding waste?

Becoming LEAN continues to be a popular topic for most companies, and the goal is simple; focus on value-add activities and eliminate waste. Value-add activities are processes that support what the customer is willing to pay for, also known as your product or service. Waste is anything that gets in the way of this. When you really think about it, a business is nothing more than a string of processes, and if a process exists, there is a cost to that process. Period. Therefore, the ultimate goal should be to eliminate any process, or reduce the process waste, that does not add value to the customer.

Think of ordering a product from Amazon. As an Amazon Prime member, you order the product and like black magic, your product is magically delivered two days later. But it isn’t magic. The path to achieving guaranteed 2-Day delivery from Amazon didn’t happen overnight. Their process was examined, value-add activities maximized, wastes eliminated, and the customer is positively and directly affected by these actions. We should look at our processes and take the same approach.

If the rule of 80/20 applies (which it always does), this means 80% of your daily work is non-value add. Let’s think about that. Is the customer paying you to read this blog on company time? Is the customer paying you to update that special KPI that doesn’t affect them?

What would happen if you instead focused your efforts directly on what directly impacts the customer, which essentially boils down to our products and lead time? What if you question yourself every day about every task, “Is the customer going to benefit from this change?”

Again, 80% of the time, the customer does not benefit, so why are we continually adding waste and how do we stop? The answer is simple. Stop contributing to non-value-add tasks. Literally, stop! And if you can’t stop, then challenge yourself to reduce the total amount of non value-add tasks (ie. waste) from your process. Reduce the DOWNTIME on every project.

D – Defects. The goal is to eliminate defects and create a disturbance-free or defect-free environment.

O – Over Production. Don’t produce more than the customer requires. Think of a professional football game and all of the food being made to serve fans. Now think about the end of the game and how much food was leftover (i.e. over produced). If 1pc flow was implemented, over producing is kept in check.

W – Waiting. Imagine driving 10 hours to your destination, only to be stuck waiting in traffic for an additional 4 hours. What a waste!

N – Non-Utilized Talent. As a manager or supervisor, it is your duty and privilege to coach employees and tap into your teammates’ talent. Find their passion, coach them to follow their passion, and help them reach their goals. The world needs more do-ers and people executing their abilities to their fullest potential. Talent that is not tapped into is undoubtedly a waste.

T – Transportation. Analyze distance traveled, count how many steps from point A to point B and create a spaghetti diagram to map out the back and forth of a process. Reduce and eliminate accordingly.

I –  Inventory: Inventory gets lost, stolen, breaks, is outdated, etc. Getting to JIT (Just in Time) is the ultimate goal. This means your inventory arrives “just in time” when it is needed by the customer instead of sitting on a shelf.

M – Motion: An Olympic sprinter has perfect form. Any wasted motion does not add value to help him/her win the race. Reduce and eliminate unnecessary motion, twisting, turning, etc.

E – Excessive Processing: Reduce the total touches a product or item is handled, read, etc. Avoid rework!

Now that you are equipped to identify waste in your process, I challenge you to be a change agent in your department to focus on what the customer pays for and reduce or eliminate the tasks the customer does not pay for. It’s difficult and it’s trying, but it’s worth it!

Project Uptime – Pay Me Now or Pay Me Later

Back when I worked in the tier 1 automotive industry we were always trying to find time to break into our production schedule to perform preventative maintenance. The idea for this task was to work on the assembly machines or weld cells to improve sensor position, sensor and cable protection and of course clean the machines. As you all know this is easier said than done due to unplanned downtime or production schedule changes, for example. As hard as it is to find time for PM’s (preventative maintenance) it is a must to stay ahead and on top of production. PM’s will not only increase the production time, but it will also help maintain better quality parts by producing less scrap and machine downtime due damaged sensors or cables.

If you have read any of my previous posts you have probably noticed that I refer to the “pay me now or pay me later” analogy. This subject would fall directly into this category, you have to take the time to prevent machine crashes and damaged sensors and cables on the front side rather than being reactive and repairing them when they go down. It has been proven that a properly bunkered or protected proximity sensor will outlast the machine tooling when best practices are executed. It’s important to take the time and look at the way a sensor is mounted or protected or acknowledge when a cable is routed in harm’s way.

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PM’s should be an important task that is part of a schedule and followed through in any factory automation or tier 1 production facility. In some cases I have seen where there is a complete bill of material (BOM) or list of tasks to accomplish during the PM time. This list will help maintenance personnel and engineering know what to look for and what are the hot spots that create unplanned downtime.  This list could also indicate some key sensors, mounting brackets and high durability cables that can improve the process.

For more information on a full solution supplier or products that can improve and decrease downtime click here.

3 Tips for Reducing Downtime

Whether it’s through preventative maintenance or during planned machine downtime, reducing downtime is a common goal for manufacturers. Difficult environments create challenges for not just machines, but also the components like sensors or cables. Below are three tips to help protect these components and reduce your downtime.

sacraficialcableCables don’t last forever. However, they are important for operations and keeping them functional is vital. An easy way to help reduce downtime and save money is by implementing a “sacrificial cable” in unforgiving environments. A sacrificial cable is any cable less than two meters in length and placed in situations where there is high turnover of cables.  This sacrificial cable does not have to be a specialty cable with a custom jacket. It can be a simple 1 meter PVC cable that will get changed out often. The idea is to place a sacrificial cable in a problematic area and connect it to a longer length cable, or a home-run cable. The benefits of this method include: less downtime for maintenance when changing out failures, reduced expenses since shorter cables are less expensive, and there is less travel for the cable around a cell.

hdc_cablesA second way to help reduce downtime is consider your application conditions up front. We discussed some of the application conditions to consider in a previous blog post, but how can we address these challenges? Not only is it important to choose the correct sensor for the environment, but remember, cables don’t last forever. Choosing the appropriate cable is also key to reducing downtime. Welding environments demand a cable that weld beads will not stick to and fuse the cable to the sensor. There are a variety of jacket types like silicone, silicone tube, or PTFE that prevent weld debris from accumulating on the cable. I’ve also seen applications where there is a lot of debris cutting through cables. In this case, a stainless steel braid cable would be a better solution than a traditional cable. Fitting the right protection to the right application is crucial..

gizmo4A third tip to help reduce your machine downtime is to simply add protection to your existing components. Adding protection, whether it is a protective bracket or a silicone product, will help keep components running longer. This type of protection can be added before or after the cell is operational.   One example of sensor protection is adding a ceramic cap to protect the face of a sensor. You can also protect the connection by adding tubing to the cable out version of the sensor to shield it from debris. Mounting sensors in a robust bracket helps protect the sensor from being hit, or having debris cover the sensor.  There are different degrees of changes that help prolong operations.

Metalforming expert, Dave Bird, explains some of these solutions in the video below. To learn more you can also visit our website at www.balluff.us.

 

A Simple Out Feed Solution for Progressive Stamping

Applications where sensor contact is unavoidable are some of the most challenging to solve. Metal forming processes involving over travel can also damage or even destroy a sensor causing failure and expensive unplanned downtime. Manufacturers often try to remedy this with in-house manufactured spring loaded out-feed mechanisms but those are expensive to make by experienced tool and die personnel who have more important things to do . Over the years, I’ve seen this as a pervasive problem in the stamping industry. Many of these issues can be solved with the use of a simple yet effective  sensor actuator system known as a plunger probe.

Plunger probe solves a few key issues in Progressive stamping:

  • The flexible trigger/actuation point is fully adjustable to meet sensitive or less sensitive activation points, not possible with “fixed” systems with substantial “over travel” built into the design.
  • It is fully self-contained (minimizing any risk of sensor damage and resulting unplanned machine down time).
  • The device can be disassembled and rapidly cleaned, reassembled, and placed back in service in the event that die lube or other industrial fluids enter the M18 body that can potentially congeal during shut down periods.

See me demo this product in the following video:

For more information visit www.balluff.us.

You can also learn more in our one page product update flyer.

Stop Industrial Network Failures With One Simple Change

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It’s the worst when a network goes down on a piece of equipment.  No diagnostics are available to help troubleshooting and all communication is dead.  The only way to find the problem is to physically and visually inspect the hardware on the network until you can find the culprit.  Many manufacturers have told me over the past few months about experiences they’ve had with down networks and how a simple cable or connector is to blame for hours of downtime.

2013-08-19_Balluff-IO-Link_Mexico_Manufactura-de-Autopartes_healywBy utilizing IO-Link, which has been discussed in these earlier blogs, and by changing the physical routing of the network hardware, you can now eliminate the loss of communication.  The expandable architecture of IO-Link allows the master to communicate over the industrial network and be mounted in a “worry-free” zone away from any hostile environments.  Then the IO-Link device is mounted in the hostile environment like a weld cell and it is exposed to the slag debris and damage.  If the IO-Link device fails due to damage, the network remains connected and the IO-Link master reports detailed diagnostics on the failure and which device to replace.  This can dramatically reduce the amount of time production is down.  In addition the IO-Link device utilizes a simple sensor cable for communication and can use protection devices designed for these types of cables.  The best part of this is that the network keeps communicating the whole time.

If you are interested in learning more about the benefits that IO-Link can provide to manufacturers visit www.balluff.us.

2 Solutions for Preventing Catastrophic Metal Forming Events

Have you ever heard the phrase, “Nine pounds of stuff in a one pound bag?”, or otherwise known as the “Blivet Effect?”

I’ve recently experience this, actually four incidences in three different companies to be exact. It revolves the wrong shut height.  When the recipe in a press doesn’t match die dimensions, or when the die dimensions are estimated, some bad things can happen.

In all of these companies, stamping presses of various tonnage ratings were run with a die that was over shut height dimension (the first hit caused a kaboom!).  Dies were locked up so badly, that they had to be torched, cut, and/or mechanically coaxed out.  In all cases, it took several days for this process to take place, causing lost production and significant down time (not to mention the financial loss and aggravation for a multitude of employees).

In order to eliminate these situations, here are two off-the-shelf electronic solutions that can be installed:
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Inductive Sensor Protection and Positioning Made Easy – Use a Prox Mount

Written by: Jeff Himes

“Downtime” is never a good word in any manufacturing facility.  It means something has malfunctioned or broken, parts are not being made, production is reduced, and money is being lost.  In some cases this downtime may be caused by a physically damaged inductive proximity sensor.  If this failure mode is happening on a regular basis to the same location, it may be time to look at the advantages a prox mount can provide.

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