Which Photoelectric Sensor Should I Be Using?

There are many variations within the category of photoelectric sensors, so how do you select the best sensor for your application? Below, I will discuss the benefits of different types of photoelectric sensors and sensing modes.

Through Beam

Through beam sensors consist of an emitter and a receiver. The emitter produces a beam of light, while the receiver identifies whether that light is present or not. So, when an object breaks the beam, an output is triggered by the receiver. Some of the advantages of using the simple through beam technology is that, unlike some of the other photoelectric sensors, it doesn’t matter the color, texture or transparency of your target.

Retroreflective

What if you would like to have a through beam sensor, but don’t have enough room for two sensor heads in your application? Retroreflective sensors have an emitter and receiver within one housing and use a high-quality reflector to reflect the light beam back to the sensor head. This allows for easy connection of just one sensor head, but it doesn’t have the range of your typical through beam sensor. When using these types of sensors, you must factor in how small or reflective your target material is. If you are trying to sense a highly reflective material, then the light reflected back to the receiver could cause the sensor to think an object is present. If you are having these problems, but still want to use a retroreflective sensor, then you should consider versions with a polarizing lens. These lenses make the sensors insensitive to interference with shiny, reflective material.

Fork

Fork sensors include the transmitter and receiver in one housing, and they are already aligned. This saves time and energy during set up. Fork sensors are fantastic for small component and detail detection.

Diffuse

If you don’t have room for a sensor head on each side of your application or even a reflector, or you have had trouble with the alignment of a retroreflective sensor, a diffuse sensor may be a good choice. Diffuse sensors use technology to be able reflect light off the material and back to the sensor. This eliminates the need for a second device or reflector. This significantly reduces set up. You can simply place your target material in front of the sensor and teach it to that point. Once your object reaches that point, the light will be reflected back to the sensor, producing the output. While they are simpler to install, they also have a shorter range compared to through beam sensors and may be affected by your material’s color or the reflectivity or your background… Unless, you have a diffuse sensor with background suppression.

Background Suppression

Diffuse sensors have an emitter and receiver in one housing. In diffuse sensors with background suppression, the emitter and receiver are at a fixed angle so that they intersect at the position of your target material. This will help narrow the operating area (area in which your target material will be entering) and not let reflective material in the background have an influence in your detection.

Conclusion

Photoelectric sensors are simple to use when you need non-contact detection of a material’s presence, color, distance, size or shape, and with their various types, housing and sizes, you can find one that is ideal for your application.