Back to the Basics: Object Detection

In the last post about the Basics of Automation, we discussed how humans act as a paradigm for automation. Now, let’s take a closer look at how objects can be detected, collected and positioned with the help of sensors.

Sensors can detect various materials such as metals, non-metals, solids and liquids, all completely without contact. You can use magnetic fields, light and sound to do this. The type of material you are trying to detect will determine the type of sensor technology that you will use.

Object Detection 1

Types of Sensors

  • Inductive sensors for detecting any metallic object at close range
  • Capacitive sensors for detecting the presence of level of almost any material and liquid at close range
  • Photoelectric sensors such as diffuse, retro-reflective or through-beam detect virtually any object over greater distances
  • Ultrasonic sensors for detecting virtually any object over greater distances

Different Sensors for Different Applications

The different types of sensors used will depend on the type of application. For example, you will use different sensors for metal detection, non-metal detection, magnet detection, and level detection.

Detecting Metals

If a workpiece or similar metallic objects Object Detection 2should be detected, then an inductive sensor is the best solution. Inductive sensors easily detect workpiece carriers at close range. If a workpiece is missing it will be reliably detected. Photoelectric sensors detect small objects, for example, steel springs as they are brought in for processing. Thus ensures a correct installation and assists in process continuity. These sensors also stand out with their long ranges.

Detecting Non-Metals

If you are trying to detect non-metal objects, for example, the height of paper stacks, Object Detection 3then capacitive sensors are the right choice. They will ensure that the printing process runs smoothly and they prevent transport backups. If you are checking the presence of photovoltaic cells or similar objects as they are brought in for processing, then photoelectic sensors would be the correct choice for the application.

Detecting Magnets

Object Detection 4

To make sure that blister packs are exactly positioned in boxes or that improperly packaged matches are sorted out, a magnetic field sensor is needed which is integrated into the slot. It detects the opening condition of a gripper, or the position of a pneumatic ejector.

 

Level Detection

What if you need to detect the level of granulate in containers? Then the solution is to use capacitive sensors. To accomplish this, two sensors are attached in the containers, offset from each other. A signal is generated when the minimum or maximum level is exceeded. This prevents over-filling or the level falling below a set amount. However, if you would like to detect the precise fill height of a tank without contact, then the solution would be to use an ultrasonic sensor.

Stay tuned for future posts that will cover the essentials of automation. To learn more about the Basics of Automation in the meantime, visit www.balluff.com.

Solve Difficult Sensing Applications with Ultrasonic Technology

When reviewing or approaching an application, we all know that the correct sensor technology plays a key role in reliable detection of production parts or even machine positioning. In many cases, application engineers choose photoelectric sensors Image1as their go-to solution, as they seem more common and familiar. Photoelectric sensors are solid performers in a variety of applications, but they can run into limitations under certain conditions. In these circumstances, considering an ultrasonic sensor could provide a solid solution.

An ultrasonic sensor operates by emitting ultra-high-frequency sound waves. The sensor monitors the distance to the target by measuring the elapsed time between the emitted and returned sound waves.

Ultrasonic sensors are not affected by color, like photoelectric sensors sometimes are. Therefore, if the target is black in color or transparent, the ultrasonic sensor can still provide a reliable detection output where the photoelectric sensor may not. I was recently approached with an application where a Image2customer needed to detect a few features on a metal angle iron. The customer was using a laser photoelectric sensor with analog feedback measurement, however the results were not consistent or repeatable as the laser would simply pick up every imperfection that was present on the angle iron. This is where the ultrasonic sensors came in, providing a larger detection range that was unaffected by surface characteristics of the irregular target. This provided a much more stable output signal, allowing the customer to reliably detect and error-proof the angle iron application. With the customer switching to ultrasonic sensors in this particular application, they now have better quality control and reduced downtime.
Image3

So when approaching any application, keep in mind that there is a variety of sensor technologies available, and some will provide better results than others in a given situation. Ultrasonic sensors are indeed an excellent choice when applied correctly. They can measure fill level, stack height, web sag, or simply monitor the presence of a target or object. They can also perform reliably in foggy or dusty areas where optical-based technologies sometimes fall short.

For more information on ultrasonic and photoelectric sensors visit www.balluff.com.

IP Ratings and ECOLAB Basics

WashdownSensorsIntegrating sensors in washdown applications can be confusing when considering the various approvals.  So what do they all mean?  If a sensor is an IP69K rated sensor does that mean it will survive everything?  In the world of sensors there is IP54, IP67, IP68 and IP69 so if my sensor is IP69K that means it is the best right?  The short answer is no.  Let’s take a brief look at the differences.

IP ratings will generally have two digits with the first digit referring to the solid particle protection.  The second digit indicates the level of protection against the ingress of water.

Sensors rated for IP54 indicates they are dust protected, meaning that dust can get inside the sensor, however, it cannot be enough to interfere with the operation of the equipment –  this is designated by the 5.  The 4 indicates that the sensor withstands splashing water on the housing from any direction with no detrimental effect.  The test for the splashing of water lasts at least five minutes with a water volume of 2.64 gallons per minute with a pressure of 7.25 to 21.76 PSI.

IP67 rated sensors are the most commonly used sensors on the market.  Even most electrical enclosures used in automation are IP67 rated.  The 6 indicates these devices will not allow the entry of dust.  The 7 indicates that the sensor can be immersed in water to a depth of 1 meter for 30 minutes.

IP68 rated sensors are dust tight sensors that can be immersed in water continuously under conditions specified by the manufacturer.  Typically the depth of the immersion is 3 meters.

The IP69K rating is based on a dust tight sensor that can withstand high pressure sprays.  The devices are sprayed with a pressure of 1,160 to 1,450 PSI.  The water temperature can be as high as 176°F with a flow rate of 3.7 to 4.2 gallons per minute.  The distance from the nozzle to the device is 4 to 6 inches.  The sensor is placed on a rotary table that rotates at 5 revolutions per minute and the sensor is sprayed for 30 seconds at four angles 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90°.

The ultimate sensor would have a rating of IP67/IP68/IP69 indicating that it will survive submersion and high pressure washdown.  Also, some of these sensors are 316L stainless meaning they have low carbon content and are more corrosion resistant than other stainless steel grades.  Are all IP69K sensors stainless steel?  No, some sensors utilize polycarbonate-ABS thermoplastic.

Usually during washdown applications in the food and beverage industry the spray is not just water but some sort of cleaning chemical or disinfectant.  These aggressive cleaning and disinfecting agents can attack different housing materials.  This is addressed by the ECOLAB certification.

The ECOLAB test consists of testing the housing and sensor materials to exposure to these aggressive cleaning and disinfecting agents.  The devices are tested for 14 to 28 days at a room temperature of 68° F.  During this time the sensor is visually inspected for swelling, embrittlement, or changes in color.

Don’t forget that even though the sensor has the correct IP rating for your application that the mating connector has to meet the same specifications.  For example, if the sensor is IP69K rated and a IP67 mating cable is used then the lower IP rating has precedence.

If you are interested in what sensors and cables meet washdown requirements, please visit www.balluff.us.

What’s best for integrating Poka-yoke or Mistake Proofing sensors?

Teams considering poka-yoke or mistake proofing applications typically contact us with a problem in hand.  “Can you help us detect this problem?”

We spend a lot of time:

  • talking about the product and the mistakes being made
  • identifying the error and how to contain it
  • and attempting to select the best sensing technology to solve the application.

However this can sometimes be the easy part of the project.  Many times a great sensor solution is identified but the proper controls inputs are not available or the control architecture doesn’t support analog inputs or network connections.  The amount of time and dollar investments to integrate the sensor solution dramatically increases and sometimes the best poka-yoke solutions go un-implemented!”

“Sometimes the best poka-yoke solutions go un-implemented!”

Many of our customers are finding that the best controls architecture for their continuous improvement processes involves the use of IO-Link integrated with their existing architectures.  It can be very quickly integrated into the existing controls and has a wide variety of technologies available.  Both of these factors make it the best for integrating Poka-yoke or Mistake Proofing due to the great flexibility and easy integration.

Download this whitepaper and read about how a continuous improvement technician installed and integrated an error-proofing sensor in 20 minutes!

Ultrasonic Sensor Reflection Targets

In my previous posts (Ultrasonic Sensors with Analog Output, Error-proofing in Window Mode, and The Other Retro-Reflective Sensors) we covered the Ultrasonic sensor modes and how they benefit in many different types of applications. It is also important to understand the reflection properties of various materials and how they interface with the sensor selected. For example some Photoelectric sensors will have a very difficult time detecting clear materials such as glass or clear films as they will simply detect directly through the clear material detecting what is on the other side giving a false positive target reading. As we know, this is not an issue with an Ultrasonic sensor as they detect targets via a sound wave so clear objects do not affect the sensors function. When looking at sensor technologies it is import to understand the material target before selecting the correct sensor for the applied application such as an Inductive sensor would be selected if we are looking at a ferrous (metal) target at short range. Below are some examples of good and poor reflective materials when Ultrasonic sensors are used.

Good Reflective MaterialsUltrasonicApplication

  • Water
  • Paint
  • Wood
  • Metal
  • Plastic
  • Concrete/Stone
  • Glass
  • Hard Rubber
  • Hard Foam

Challenging Relective Materials

  • Cotton Wool
  • Soft Carpet
  • Soap Foams
  • Powders With Air
  • Soft Foam
  • Soft Rubber

So as you can see materials that are hard or solid have good reflective properties whereas soft materials will absorb the sound wave provided from the sensor making it much more challenging to detect our target. For more information on Ultrasonic sensors click here.

Ultrasonic Sensors with Analog Output

Many times in an application we need more than a simple discrete on/off output. For a more accurate detection mode we can utilize analog outputs to monitor position, height, fill-levels and part presence typically found in object detection assemblies. When utilizing Ultrasonic sensors with an analog output we can simply measure the distance value that is proportional to the distance of our target within the operating range of the sensor. Typically 0…10V or 4…20mA outputs are available with the option of rising or falling characteristics. Rising and falling is a way to invert the view of the output, so 0…10V would simply be inverted to 10…0V or 4…20mA would be 20…4mA.

Ultrasonic sensor offerings are a great alternative as they can deal with difficult targets that are typically a challenge for other sensor technologies. They also offer very good resolution with the options of long and short range detection. Below is an example of a 4…20mA linear output. As you can see the closer our target gets to the sensor face it indicates an output closer to 4mA and the further away from the sensor it will provide and output closer to 20mA. For more information on Ultrasonic sensors, click here.

AnalogUltrasonic

Error-proofing in Window Mode – Ultrasonic Sensing

In my previous post, I talked about Ultrasonic Sensors utilizing reflected mode. Window mode is an extension of the reflective mode setting. When the sensor is set up in window mode the sensor is only activated when the object target is located within the detection limit setting defined within the detection range of the sensor. So, for example a sensor that has 65…350mm operating range could be set up to see a target within 100…150mm. This mode is commonly used when target sizes require wider tolerances or size such as detecting tall to short targets or simply detecting the correct size of the target. Additionally, if the sensor selected offers an Analog output you can receive output within the new defined window.

Continue reading “Error-proofing in Window Mode – Ultrasonic Sensing”

The Other Retro-Reflective Sensors

Most of the time when we think of Retro-Reflective sensors the first thing that comes to mind is a photoelectric sensor. Photoelectric offerings use a reflector to reflect light from the internally mounted emitter and receiver. Retro photoelectric sensors come in many form factors with light source options such as infrared, red light and laser types.

Ultrasonic sensors are commonly forgotten when reflective sensors are needed in a particular application. Ultrasonic sensors when set up in “Window Mode” are similar to a photoelectric sensor however the ultrasonic sensor can use an existing background as the reflective surface such as a metal plate or a solid background. The sensor simply returns a signal as soon as an object fully covers the reflector. This mode is ideal for detecting difficult targets that photoelectric sensor can have trouble with such as poorly reflective materials

ultrasonicThe example shows an Ultrasonic sensor set up in window mode. The sensor is sending a sound wave to the background (reflector) so a target can be detected when entering the detection area between the sensor and the reflector background.

For more information Ultrasonic sensors, click here.

Level Detection with Ultrasonic Sensors

Liquid measurement can be a demanding application therefore selecting the most effective sensor technology is imperative. Ultrasonic sensors are the ideal solution for distance measurement or position detection of granules, fluids and powders. They measure fill levels, heights and sag without making contact as well as count and monitor the presence of objects. They are extremely versatile, operate independently of color and surface finish, and are not affected by transparent objects that generate strong reflections. And because they are not affected by dust, dirt and steam, they are the ideal choice for critical applications.

Ultrasonic Sensors operate with propagation of sound waves providing a reliable detection source for level detection applications where liquid measurement monitoring is necessary. They will enhance the flexibility of the application with additional advantages of being a non-contact sensor so there are no mechanical floats or arms that can retain residual liquid build up. This residual material can cause machine application downtime as interruption of production is needed to maintain and clean the mechanical monitoring system. Because the distance to the object is determined via a sound transit time, ultrasonic sensors have excellent background suppression. With their transit time measurement, ultrasonic sensors can record the measured value with highly precise resolution (some sensors to even 0.025 mm). Ultrasonic Sensors can monitor
and detect nearly any liquid.

Level Detection with Ultrasonic Sensors2Level Detection with Ultrasonic SensorsAn ultrasonic sensor is not affected by the color, transparency or glossiness of a surface. They can reliably detect bulk materials, liquids and material surfaces. Good reflective materials include:

  • „„ Water
  • „„ Paint/varnish
  • Wood
  • Metal
  • Plastic
  • Stone/concrete
  • Glass
  • Hard foam rubber

Additional advantages ultrasonic sensors provide when monitoring liquid is their ability to have two independent outputs programmed into one sensor. This is a great way to monitor upper and lower liquid levels with one sensor. This sensor feature allows one independent output setting to indicate a minimum level and the second output to indicate a maximum level concurrently providing constant feedback along with a voltage or current output.

Precise Operating Angles

When looking at Ultrasonic Sensor Technology one of the most problematic areas of application is false positive outputs due to a large operating angle. It is not uncommon to have an Ultrasonic Sensor in an application where the sensor has such a large degree of operating angle that the senor is detecting an object other than the desired target. In my past blog post I explained in detail the “Blind Zone” and how important it is to understand your minimum working area. In the video below you’ll see that Ultrasonic Sensors can offer a tight precise “Operating Angle” that detects a desired target without detecting other obstacles that may be present within the application area. For more information on these Ultrasonic Sensors, click here.