How flexible inspection capabilities help meet customization needs and deliver operational excellence

As the automotive industry introduces more options to meet the growing complexities and demands of its customers (such as increased variety of trim options) it has rendered challenges to the automotive manufacturing industry.

Demands of the market filter directly back to the manufacturing floor of tier suppliers as they must find the means to fulfill the market requirements on a flexible industrial network, either new or existing. The success of their customers is dependent on the tier supplier chain delivering within a tight timeline. Whereby, if pressure is applied upon that ecosystem, it will mean a more difficult task to meet the JIT (just in time) supply requirements resulting in increased operating costs and potential penalties.

Meeting customer requirements creates operational challenges including lost production time due to product varieties and tool change time increases. Finding ways to simplify tool change and validate the correct components are placed in the correct assembly or module to optimize production is now an industry priority. In addition, tracking and traceability is playing a strong role in ensuring the correct manufacturing process has been followed and implemented.

How can manufacturing implement highly flexible inspection capabilities while allowing direct communication to the process control network and/or MES network that will allow the capability to change inspection characteristics on the fly for different product inspection on common tooling?

Smart Vision Inspection Systems

Compact Smart Vision Inspection System technology has evolved a long way from the temperamental technologies of only a decade ago. Systems offered today have much more robust and simplistic intuitive software tools embedded directly in the Smart Vision inspection device. These effective programming cockpit tools allow ease of use to the end user at the plant providing the capability to execute fast reliable solutions with proven algorithm tools. Multi-network protocols such as EthernetIP, ProfiNet, TCP-IP-LAN (Gigabit Ethernet) and IO-LINK have now come to realization. Having multiple network capabilities delivers the opportunity of not just communicating the inspection result to the programmable logic controller (via process network) but also the ability to send image data independent of the process network via the Gigabit Ethernet network to the cloud or MES system. The ability to over-lay relevant information onto the image such as VIN, Lot Code, Date Code etc. is now achievable.  In addition, camera housings have become more industrially robust such as having aluminum housings with an ingress protection rating of IP67.

Industrial image processing is now a fixture within todays’ manufacturing process and is only growing. The technology can now bring your company a step closer to enabling IIOT by bringing issues to your attention before they create down time (predictive maintenance). They aid in reaching operational excellence as they uncover processing errors, reduce or eliminate scrap and provide meaningful feedback to allow corrective actions to be implemented.

What to Ask Before You Build an RFID System to Meet Your Traceability Needs

An industrial RFID system is a powerful solution for reliably and comprehensively documenting individual working steps in manufacturing environments. But an industrial RFID system that meets your application needs isn’t available off-the-shelf. To build the system you need, it is important to consider what problems you hope RFID will solve and what return on investments you hope to see.

RFID can deliver many benefits, including process visibility and providing data needed to better manage product quality. It can be used to improve safety, satisfaction and profit margins. It can even be used to help comply with regulatory standards or to manage product recalls. And RFID can be used in a wide range of applications from broad areas like supply management to inventory tracking to more specific applications. These improvements can improve time, cost or performance—though not typically all three.

It is essential to understand and document the goal and how improvements will be measured to in order to plan a RFID system (readers, antennas, tags, cables) to best meet those goals.

Other important questions to consider:

Will the system be centralized or de-centralized? Will the system be license plate only or contain process data on the tag?

How will the data on the tags be used?  Will the information be used to interface with a PLC, database or ERP? Will it be used to provide MES or logical functionality? Or to provide data to an HMI or web browser/cloud interface?

Will the system be required to comply with any international regulations or standards? If so, which ones: EPC Global, Class 1 Gen 2 (UHF only), ISO 15693, or 14443 (HF only)?

What environment does the system need to perform in? Will it be used indoor or outdoor? Will it be exposed to liquids (cleaning fluids, coolants, machine oils, caustics) or high or low temperatures?

Does the RFID system need to work with barcodes or any other human readable information?

What are the performance expectations for the components? What is the read/write range distance from head to tag? What is the station cycle timing? Is the tag metal-mounted? Does the tag need to be reused or be disposable? What communication bus is required?

With a clear set of objectives and goals, the mechanical and physical requirements discovered by answering the questions above, and guidance from an expert, a RFID system can be configured that meets your needs and delivers a strong return on investment.

Zone Defense: How to Determine If You Need a Hygienic or Washdown Solution

It goes without saying that food safety is an extremely important aspect of the food and beverage industry. While manufacturers would naturally take precautions to ensure their food products are safe to consume, they are required to follow a set of rigid guidelines and standards to ensure the safety of the foodstuffs to prevent contamination.

CaptureTo determine which rating, standards or certifications are required for a particular food and beverage segment, you must first consider the type of food contact zone and whether it is an open or closed process.

Food Contact Zones

The food contact zone is determined by the potential contamination that can occur based on the production equipment’s exposure to food and its byproducts.

  • Food Zone: an area intended to be exposed to direct contact with food or surfaces where food or other substances may contact and then flow, drain or drain back onto food or food contact surfaces.
  • Splash Zone: an area that is routinely exposed to indirect food contact due to splashes and spills. These areas are not intended for contact with consumable food.
  • Nonfood Zone: An area that is not exposed to food or splashes but will likely be exposed to minor dirt and debris.

Open and Closed Production

In the food and beverage industry, it is also important to discuss whether the manufacturing process is open or closed. The distinction between the two plays a significant role in determining machine cleaning requirements.

  • Closed Process: A manufacturing operation in which the food product never comes in contact with the environment. All food contact zones are sealed such as the inner surfaces of tanks, pipelines, valves, pumps and sensors.
  • Open Process: A manufacturing operation in which food does have contact with the environment outside of the machine. This requires a hygienic design of the process environment, as well as the surfaces of the apparatus and components.

Required ratings, standards and certifications

Once you know the food zone and whether the production is open or closed, it becomes simple to determine which ratings, standards or certifications are required of the machinery and apparatus in the food and beverage manufacturing process.

  • Food Contact Zone — Hygienic
    • IP69K – tested to be protected from high pressure steam cleaning per DIN40050 part 9
    • FDA – made of FDA approved materials, most often 316L stainless steel
    • 3-A – certified sanitary and hygienic equipment materials and design in the US
    • EHEDG – certified sanitary and hygienic equipment materials and design in Europe
  • Food Splash Zone — Washdown
    • IP69K – tested to be protected from high pressure steam cleaning per DIN40050 part 9
    • ECOLAB – surfaces tested to be protected from cleaning and disinfecting agents
  • Nonfood Zone — Factory Automation
    • IP67 – rated for water immersion up to a meter deep for half an hour
    • IP65 – rated as dust tight and protected against water projected from a nozzle

For more information on the requirements of the food and beverage industry, visit www.balluff.com.

Operational Excellence – How Can We Apply Best Practices Within the Weld Shop?

Reducing manufacturing costs is absolutely a priority within the automotive manufacturing industry. To help reduce costs there has been and continues to be pressure to lower MRO costs on high volume consumables such as inductive proximity sensors.

Traditionally within the MRO community, the strategy has been to drive down the unit cost of components from their suppliers year over year to ensure reduce costs as much as possible. Of course, cost optimization is important and should continue to be, but factors other than unit cost should be considered. Let’s explore some of these as it would apply to inductive proximity sensors in the weld shop.

Due to the aggressive manufacturing environment within weld cell, devices such as inductive proximity sensors are subjected to a variety of hostile factors such as high temperature, impact damage, high EMF (electromagnetic fields) and weld spatter. All of these factors drastically reduce the life of these devices.

There are  manufacturing costs associated with a failed device well beyond that of the unit cost of the device itself. These real costs can be and are reflected in incremental premium costs such as increased downtime (both planned and unplanned),  poor asset allocation, indirect inventory, expedited freight, outsourcing costs, overtime, increased manpower, higher scrap levels, and sorting & rework costs. All of these factors negatively affect a facility’s Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE).

Root Cause

In selection of inductive proximity sensors for the weld manufacturing environment there are root cause misconceptions and poor responses to the problem. Responses include: leave the sensor, mounting and cable selection up to the machine builder; bypass the failed sensor and keep running production until the failed device can be replaced; install multiple vending machines in the plant to provide easier access to spare parts (replace sensors often to reduce unplanned downtime);  and the sensors are going to fail anyway so just buy the cheapest device possible.

None of these address the root cause of the failure. They mask the root cause and exacerbate the scheduled and unscheduled downtime or can cause serious part contamination issues down stream, resulting in enormous penalties from their customer.

So, how can we implement a countermeasure to help us drive out these expensive operating costs?

  • Sensor Mounting – Utilize a fixed mounting system that will allow a proximity sensor to slide into perfect mounting position with a positive stop to prevent the device from being over extended and being struck by the work piece. This mounting system should have a weld spatter protective coating to reduce the adherence of weld spatter. This will also provide extra impact protection and a thermal barrier to further assist in protecting the sensing device asset.
  • The Sensor – Utilize a robust fully weld protective coated stainless steel body and face proximity sensor. For applications with the sensor in an “on state” during the weld cycle and/or to detect non-ferrous utilize a proper weld protective coated Factor 1 (F1) device.
  • Cabling – A standard cable will not withstand a weld environment such as MIG welding. Even a cable with protective tubing can have open areas vulnerable for weld berries to land and cause burn through on the cables resulting in a dead short. A proper weld sensor cord set with protective coating on the lock nut, high temp rated and weld resistant overmold to a weld resistant jacketed cable should be used.

By implementing a weld best practice total solution as described above, you will realize significant increases in your facilities OEE contributing to the profitability and sustainability of your organization.

Ask these 3 simple questions:

1) What is the frequency of failure

2) What is the Mean Time To Repair (MTTR)

3) What is the cost per minute of downtime.

Once you have that information you will know with your own metrics  what the problem is costing your facility by day/month/year. You may be surprised to see how much of a financial burden these issues are costing you. Investing in the correct best practice assets will allow you to realize immediate results to boost your company OEE.

Top 5 Insights from 2018

With the start of the new year, let’s take a look at the top 5 insights from 2018.

1. An Easy Way to Remember PNP and NPN Sensor Wiring

“Switched” refers to which side of the controlled load (relay, small indicator, PLC input) is being switched electrically. Either the load is connected to Negative and the Positive is switched (PNP), or the load is connected to Positive and the Negative is switched (NPN). These diagrams illustrate the differences between the two connections…READ MORE

2. Back to the Basics: What is the Value of IO-Link?

With the demands for flexible manufacturing, efficient production & visibility in our factories, smart manufacturing is driving the way we work today.  Analytics and diagnostics are becoming critical to our ability to perform predictive maintenance, improve equipment effectiveness and monitor the condition of the machine as well as the components inside the machine.  Typically, our first reaction is to put these devices onto Ethernet.  However, the implementation of Ethernet requires a high skill set that is scarce in our traditional manufacturers today.  Due to the simple control architecture of IO-Link devices, it allows for many Smart devices to provide the data we need for analytics with a reduction in the Ethernet skill set that has become a roadblock for many manufacturers…READ MORE

3. What Exactly is Safety Over IO-Link?

Users of IO-Link have long been in search of a solution for implementing the demands for functional safety using IO-Link. As a first step, the only possibility was to turn the actuators off using a separate power supply (Port class “B”, Pins 2, 5), which powers down the entire module. Today there is a better answer: Safety hub with IO-Link!…READ MORE

4. Safety Over IO-Link Helps Enable Human-Robot Collaboration

Safety Over IO-Link makes it easier to align a robot’s restricted and safeguarded spaces, simplifies creation of more dynamic safety zones and allows creation of “layers” of sensors around a robot work area.

For the past several years, “collaboration” has been a hot topic in robotics.  The idea is that humans and robots can work closely together, in a safe and productive manner.  Changes in technology and standards have created the environment for this close cooperation. These standards call out four collaborative modes of operation: Power & Force Limiting, Hand Guiding, Safety Rated Monitored Stop, and Speed & Separation Monitoring (these are defined in ISO/TS 15066)…READ MORE

5. DMC vs. RFID in Manufacturing

The increasing discussions and regulations on complete traceability and reliable identification of products is making identification systems an inevitable part in manufacturing. There are two specific technologies that are very well received: The Data Matrix Code (DMC) and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)…READ MORE

Set your sights on IO-Link for machine vision products

While IO-Link is well addressed in an automated production environment, some have overlooked the benefits IO-Link can deliver for machine vision products.

PLC Gateway-Modus

Any IO-Link device can be connected and controlled by the PLC via fieldbus interface. Saving installation costs and controlling and running IO-Link components are the key values. All the well-known IO-Link benefits apply.

Rainer1

Camera-Modus – without PLC

However, with IO-Link that operates in this mode, the IO-Link-interfaces Rainer2are directly controlled. IO-Link I/O-Modules are automatically detected, configured and controlled.

In a stand-alone situation where an optical inspectionRainer3 of a component is performed without PLC, the operator delivers the component, hits a trigger button, the SmartCamera checks for completeness of production quality, sends a report to a separate customer server, and controls directly via IO-Link interface the connected vision product.

For more information about machine vision and optical identification see www.balluff.com

 

The Human Body as an Analogy for Automation

A machine’s automation system operates very much like the human body. Just as we humans perceive our surroundings using our sensory organs, a machine registers its surroundings using presence sensors, input devices, and measuring systems. It continually receives status information and command inputs, and its control network transports this information as input signals to the controller. The controller interprets these signals, makes a program decision, and responds by sending output signals to actuators and indicators. For example, it may send a signal to cylinder valves and motor drives to move the machine, or to stack lights to signal status and condition to the human operators.

A machine’s automation system is the technical counterpart to the actions of the human body:

  • Sight, taste, smell, touch – Vision, pressure, temperature, flow, photoelectric, inductive, capacitive, position/distance measurement sensors
  • Listening/reading – Vibration sensors, RFID tag readers
  • Nervous system – Control network, cables, connectors
  • Brain – Controller, PLC
  • Muscles – Valves, drives, motors
  • Voice – audio signaling devices, numerical output devices (RFID data to tag)
  • Body language (visual signals) – stack lights, display screens, indicator lights, panel meters

Check out the video below to dive deeper into the world of industrial automation and learn the similarities between a machine and the human body.

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Stay tuned for future posts that will cover the essentials of automation. To learn more about the Basics of Automation in the meantime, visit www.balluff.com.

Top 5 Automation Insights Posts from 2017

Kick off the New Year by taking a look at the top 5 Automation Insight blog posts from last year.

#5. Make sure your RFID system is future-proof by answering 3 questions

With the recent widespread adoption of RFID technology in manufacturing plants I have encountered quite a number of customers who feel like they have been “trapped” by the technology. The most common issue is their current system cannot handle the increase in the requirements of the production line. In a nutshell, their system isn’t scalable.5

Dealing with these issues after the fact is a nightmare that no plant manager wants to be a part of. Can you imagine installing an entire data collection system then having to remove it and replace it with a more capable system in 3 years or even less? It’s actually a pretty common problem in the world of technology. However, an RFID system should be viable for much longer if a few simple questions can be answered up front. Read more>>

#4. IO-Link Hydraulic Cylinder Position Feedback

Ready for a better mousetrap?  Read on…..

Some time ago here on Sensortech, we discussed considerations for choosing the right in-cylinder position feedback sensor.  In that article, we said:

“…….Analog 0-10 Vdc or 4-20 mA interfaces probably make up 70-80% of all in-cylinder feedback in use…..”

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And while that 70-80% analog figure is still not too far off, we’re starting to see those numbers decline, in favor a of newer, more capable interface for linear position feedback:  IO-Link.  Much has been written, here on Sensortech and elsewhere, about the advantages offered by IO-Link.  But until now, those advantages couldn’t necessarily be realized in the world of hydraulic cylinder position feedback.  That has all changed with the availability of in-cylinder, rod-style magnetostrictive linear position sensors.  Compared to more traditional analog interfaces, IO-Link offers some significant, tangible advantages for absolute position feedback in hydraulic cylinders. Read More>>

#3. External Position Feedback for Hydraulic Cylinders

The classic linear position feedback solution for hydraulic cylinders is the rod-style magnetostrictive sensor installed from the back end of the cylinder. The cylinder rod is gun-drilled to accept the length of the sensor probe, and a target magnet is installed on the face of the piston. A hydraulic port on the end cap provides installation access to thread-in the pressure-rated sensor tube. This type of installation carries several advantages but also some potential disadvantages depending on the application. Read More>>

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#2. 3 Smart Applications for Process Visualization

Stack lights used in today’s industrial automation haven’t changed their form or purpose for ages: to visually show the state (not status) of the work-cell. Since the introduction of SmartLight, I have seen customers give new2 meaning to the term “process visualization”. Almost every month I hear about yet another innovative use of the SmartLight. I thought capturing a few of the use-cases of the SmartLight here may help others to enhance their processes – hopefully in most cost effective manner.

The SmartLight may appear just like another stack-light.  The neat thing about it is that it is an IO-Link device and uses simply 3-wire smart communication on the same prox cable that is used for sensors in the field. Being an IO-Link device it can be programmed through the PLC or the controller for change of operation modes on demand, or change of colors, intensity, and beeping sounds as needed. What that means is it can definitely be used as a stack light but has additional modes that can be applied for all sorts of different operation/ process visualization tasks. Read More>>

#1. What is a Capacitive Sensor?

Capacitive proximity sensors are non-contact devices that can detect the presence or absence of virtually any object regardless of material.  1They utilize the electrical property of capacitance and the change of capacitance based on a change in the electrical field around the active face of the sensor.

A capacitive sensor acts like a simple capacitor.  A metal plate in the sensing face of the sensor is electrically connected to an internal oscillator circuit and the target to be sensed acts as the second plate of the capacitor.  Unlike an inductive sensor that produces an electromagnetic field a capacitive sensor produces an electrostatic field. Read More>>