How Vibration Measurement Saves Manufacturers Time and Money

Vibration is all around us. We can feel it and we can hear it. Some vibrations we find pleasant, such as music that we like to listen to, and some vibrations we find unpleasant such as scratching fingernails across the chalkboard. Humans also can predict when something is about to fail or determine when something needs our attention based on the vibrations we can feel or hear in our surroundings. An example almost anyone can relate to is when you are driving or riding in a car and the tires are out of balance or are damaged. In addition to the audible noise, you can feel the vibration through the steering wheel and the chassis of the car. Frequency and amplitude of the vibration typically increase as you speed up, and often amplify your worry as well. This can push you to find the cause of the vibration and fix it.

This same principle can be used in a manufacturing plant environment, which is what makes monitoring vibration so important. Without it, machines break down and stop, costing you time, and money. We all know that one maintenance guru that has a special gift of being able to determine what is happening with a machine based on its vibration feedback, the one who can place his hand on a machine, or hear the machine speak to him, and determine what is wrong with it.

However, using this institutional knowledge isn’t full-proof and it can introduce additional variables in the mix; sometimes resulting in wasted parts, labor, unplanned machine downtime, loss of production, etc. And as tenured staff retires and is replaced with less experienced staff, it has become even more important to remove the human element from the equation and properly capture the data to determine the root cause of mechanical issues. But how? By equipping machines with a monitoring system, the machine can then continuously monitor itself. And when the variables exceed the preset acceptable thresholds, the machine can act based on predetermined actions set by the OEM manufacturer or the maintenance team.

There are many monitoring systems on the market today that vary in complexity and cost. More complex systems include sensors, cables, data acquisition cards, computers, analysis software, data base, cloud subscription, and paid service contracts to pinpoint exact condition of the equipment or asset that is being monitored. This type of system or service is very costly, and in most cases, it is cost prohibitive to be used on non-critical equipment or assets. However, there are lower cost solutions that may not be able to pinpoint what has failed but can tell you when something wrong with the machine that needs to be examined by the maintenance technician. Such devices can be easily integrated into an existing controls architecture and can provide continuous condition monitoring of the machine or asset. Practice of continuous condition monitoring of machines can save the company valuable time and money by reducing unscheduled machine downtime, eliminating wasted parts and time for unnecessary scheduled maintenance, improving total OEE (Overall Equipment Effectiveness) of the machine, and increasing production. This all leads to increased profits.

Because there are more and more solutions available in the market today, there are few things you need to consider when choosing the right solution for your application:

  • Overall cost of implementation – hardware, software, and any installation costs?
  • Is the solution proprietary? Hardware, software, or communications?
  • Is there an annual service contract(s)? Subscriptions?
  • Does the machine/asset require periodic or continuous monitoring?
  • Quality of data? Do you need to know the exact failure point or is knowing that the machine is operating outside of its specified parameters good enough?
  • Can the system be easily expanded for the future state?
  • Are there any additional features that can aid in analyzing the condition of the machine such as pressure, temperature, humidity?

Knowing what you need and want ahead of time will help you better choose the correct solution for your application without wasting money and time on unnecessary features and functions.

 

Improve OEE, Save Costs with Condition Monitoring Data

When it comes to IIOT (Industrial Internet of Things) and the fourth industrial revolution, data has become exponentially more important to the way we automate machines and processes within a production plant. There are many different types of data, with the most common being process data. Depending on the device or sensor, process data may be as simple as the status of discrete inputs or outputs but can be as complex as the data coming from radio frequency identification (RFID) data carriers (tags). Nevertheless, process data has been there since the beginning of the third industrial revolution and the beginning of the use of programmable logic controllers for machine or process control.

With new advances in technology, sensors used for machine control are becoming smarter, smaller, more capable, and more affordable. This enables manufacturers of those devices to include additional data essential for IIOT and Industry 4.0 applications. The latest type of data manufacturers are outputting from their devices is known as condition monitoring data.

Today, smart devices can replace an entire system by having all of the hardware necessary to collect and process data, thus outputting relative information directly to the PLC or machine controller needed to monitor the condition of assets without the use of specialized hardware and software, and eliminating the need for costly service contracts and being tied to one specific vendor.

A photo-electric laser distance sensor with condition monitoring has the capability to provide more than distance measurements, including vibration detection. Vibration can be associated with loose mechanical mounting of the sensor or possible mechanical issues with the machine that the sensor is mounted. That same laser distance sensor can also provide you with inclination angle measurement to help with the installation of the sensor or help detect when there’s a problem, such as when someone or something bumps the sensor out of alignment. What about ambient data, such as humidity? This could help detect or monitor for moisture ingress. Ambient pressure? It can be used to monitor the performance of fans or the condition of the filter elements on electrical enclosures.

Having access to condition monitoring data can help OEMs improve sensing capabilities of their machines, differentiating themselves from their competition. It can also help end users by providing them with real time monitoring of their assets; improving overall equipment efficiency and better predicting  and, thereby, eliminating unscheduled and costly machine downtime. These are just a few examples of the possibilities, and as market needs change, manufacturers of these devices can adapt to the market needs with new and improved functions, all thanks to smart device architecture.

Integrating smart devices to your control architecture

The most robust, cost effective, and reliable way of collecting this data is via the IO-Link communication protocol; the first internationally accepted open, vendor neutral, industrial bi-directional communications protocol that complies with IEC61131-9 standards. From there, this information can be directly passed to your machine controller, such as PLC, via fieldbus communication protocols, such as EtherNET/Ip, ProfiNET or EtherCAT, and to your SCADA / GUI applications via OPC/UA or JSON. There are also instances where wireless communications are used for special applications where devices are placed in hard to reach places using Bluetooth or WLAN.

In the fast paced ever changing world of industrial automation, condition monitoring data collection is increasingly more important. This data can be used in predictive maintenance measures to prevent costly and unscheduled downtime by monitoring vibration, inclination, and ambient data to help you stay ahead of the game.

How to Take Advantage of IO-Link Parameter Data

IO-Link data packets contain parameter data of an IO-Link slave device that is acyclic and is only transferred when read or write is requested by the machine controller. Having parameter data available on a device is not new or groundbreaking; however, the main advantage of IO-Link parameter data is that it is directly accessible by the machine controller, and it is dynamic, meaning you do not have to take the device offline to change its parameters or configuration. Parameter data determines how flexible or configurable an IO-Link slave device is. Its content will be different from device to device and manufacturer to manufacturer, a differentiator when choosing the right device for your application. We all know that not all IO-Link devices are created equal.

So how can you take advantage of parameter data?

Automatic machine configuration

Imagine if your machine could automatically configure itself upon first power-up? Yes, it is possible. Because IO-Link parameter data is accessible by the machine controller, i.e., the PLC or PAC, one can write a routine/program that first verifies the correct device is connected to the correct port of the IO-Link master, request a parameter read, compare the parameter content to the desired configuration in the program, and overwrite the current device parameter set if necessary. Why would someone do this? Well, if you are an OEM machine builder building ten of the same machines for one end customer, it would be a worthwhile investment in programming development to have IO-Link devices configured automatically. This method would eliminate the need for manual machine parameterization and result in cost savings. Examples of typical configuration would be changing the pin assignment of an IO-Link freely configurable discrete input/output hub as an input or an output, machine home position or offset of an IO-Link linear transducer, set points of an IO-Link pressure transducer, set points of an IO-Link laser distance sensor, and so on.

Recipe change

Another way to take advantage of IO-Link parameter data is to have the machine controller automatically change device configuration based on recipe change. This would eliminate the need for an operator to manually change device parameters, thus saving time and minimizing human error, especially if the device is not easily accessible by a human.

Maintenance

Having direct access to device parameters by the machine controller also enables OEMs to simplify their machines’ serviceability. For component replacement, all the maintenance personnel would have to replace a damaged device with a new device and walk away, eliminating the need for specialized training, software, or hardware.

Some manufacturers add special functions to their IO-Link masters to enable automatic backup and restoration of IO-Link slave device parameters, making replacement of components as easy as plug and play. This function would eliminate the need for OEMs to create custom programs or logic in their PLCs to restore parameter sets on a device automatically.

How to

So how would I do this? Because parameter data is accessible by the machine controller, implementation of auto configuration differs based on what brand of controller you are using. I will mention a few of the most popular.

  • Allen Bradley – For the Allen Bradley family of PLCs, you would use an explicit  instruction to read and write IO-Link device parameters.
  • Siemens -For the Siemens family of PLCs, you would use a standard function block named “FB_IOL_CALL”.

As you can see, every PLC or machine controller manufacturer and their flavor of IDE (Integrated Development Environment) will have their unique way of accessing IO-Link device parameter set. It is best to consult with both manufacturers and review IO-Link devices and PLCs to better understand how to set the read and write parameters of an IO-Link slave device.

Conclusion

Having direct access to device parameters and being able to change them without taking the device offline or needing special software or hardware, and implement it at a device level is game-changing. It opens doors for time and cost savings in design, integration, operation, and serviceability of machines. It is different from what we are used to, so don’t be afraid to think outside of the box and jump in with both feet.

 

What data can IO-Link provide?

As an application engineer, one of the most frequent questions I get asked by the customers is “What is IO-Link and what data does it contain?”.

Well, IO-Link is the first worldwide accepted sensor communication protocol to be adopted as an international standard IEC61131-9. It is an open standard, and not proprietary to one manufacturer. It uses bi-directional, single line serial communications to transfer data between the machine controller and sensors/actuators. No other communication protocol is manufacturer and fieldbus independent, and yet provides this level of communication down to the sensor/actuator level. It provides the user with three different data types: process data, parameter data, and diagnostics or event data.

Process Data

Process data of an IO-Link smart device is considered the latest state of that device. Containing both input and output data, process data is cyclically exchanged between IO-Link master and IO-Link slave device (i.e. sensor or actuator). The time interval or data update rate solely depends on amount of data, 1 to 32 bytes, and speed at which an IO-Link slave device communicates. IO-Link standard (IEC61131-9) defines three different communications speeds; COM1 is set to 4.8kBaud (slowest), COM2 is set to 38.4kBaud and COM3 is set to 230.4kBaud (fastest). Depending on the device, process data may contain status of inputs or outputs of remote I/O hub, position feedback of linear transducers, pressure feedback from pressure transducers, information from am RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) reader, and so on. For more information about process data content, refresh rate, and data mapping, one should reference an IO-Link slave device datasheet or user manual.

Lastly, process data is then buffered in memory of the IO-Link master device and passed to the controller via a specific fieldbus at request packet interval. Request packet interval is set in the controller settings.

Process Data

Parameter Data

Parameter data contains information and parameters specific to the IO-Link slave device. This data is exchanged acyclically, which means that it is requested from the IO-Link master or controller and not time based. Parameters can be read from a specific device or written to. Parameter data is primarily used for device configuration, or verification. A key advantage of IO-Link is that it gives the controller the full access to IO-Link slave device parameters, down to a sensor/actuator level. This means that your controller, PLC or PC based, can change the configuration of an IO-Link’s slave device dynamically without taking the device off line, and without use of proprietary cabling or configuration software.

Typical use of parameter data is for automatic machine configuration, recipe change, process tuning, maintenance, and easy component replacement.

Parameter Data

Diagnostics or Event Data

Diagnostic data provides the controller with events that affect the operation and performance of the IO-Link smart device. Content can vary depending on the device used, and the manufacturer. IO-Link smart devices can provide crucial data such as load, temperature, stress level, overload and short circuit diagnostics, error codes, configuration or parameter issues, access issues, etc., as part of diagnostic or event data. The event code size is 2 bytes, and in hexadecimal data format. This information can then be interpreted by the controller/user using a lookup table or IODD (I/O Device Description) file. User manual will have diagnostic data table that can be used as a reference.

Diagnostic and Event Data

Conclusion

In conclusion, IO-Link enables a plug-and-play relationship between the controller and the devices on the machine. Using IO-Link data, the controller can automatically recognize and configure an IO-Link slave device that is connected to its network. Process and diagnostic data provide continuous feedback on machine status and health down to a sensor level — the lowest level of the automation pyramid.

Keep in mind that the content of process data is specific to the device and will vary from device to device, and manufacturer to manufacturer. This makes IO-Link data one of the main differentiators between smart devices and their manufacturers. Luckily, IO-Link is an open standard, and fieldbus and manufacturer independent, so you can mix and match devices best suited for your application without worrying about device compatibility, special cabling, or third-party configuration software packages.

automation pyramid